Goblincore in The Guardian

Originally published at: Goblincore in The Guardian | Boing Boing

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The “-punk” suffix suggests a speculative universe where the named technology has evolved beyond its real life extent – and is usually the central technology in that universe. “Cyberpunk” extrapolates a universe where augmented tech is ascendant, “steampunk” suggests an alternate history where steam-based (or steam-era) tech rules the world and has evolved beyond its historical limits, etc.

The “-core” suffix is more like a doubling-down on the trope in question to the point of extreme exaggeration (mostly without irony), or expanding a thing that’s not usually considered a basis for an environment until it’s the defining characteristic.

EDIT: As @mindysan33 points out, the way I’m using the terms here is specific to literature/media/tropes and not “-punk” vs “-core” at large.

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Since “hardcore” was a more intense version of “punk”, it just is employed to mean more intense, harder, etc…

#hottakesfrompunkhistorian

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As trope signifiers, though, “-punk” and “-core” took different routes to contemporary usage. “-Core” comes from hardcore, as you note, and so it takes on the meaning of intensifying the thing it’s modifying. But in trope-naming use, all “-punk” terms are in the legacy of “cyberpunk” quite specifically. So even though the “-punk” in “cyberpunk” does indeed come from the punk aesthetic, in the context of trope naming there’s always a technological basis, since the other “-punk” terms are following after the technological speculation introduced in the cyberpunk genre.

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Isn’t that what I said? :thinking: Maybe not…

But here is the first documented use of cyberpunk… Bethke was influenced by punk rockers specifically.

http://www.infinityplus.co.uk/stories/cpunk.htm

But punk as related to things other than music, gets deployed in ways besides denoting technological basis, I’d say. But sure, when we discuss literature that has some relation to cyberpunk, I’d agree.

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BRB. Going to embroider a mushroom on my cottagecore prairie dress.

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Maybe? I felt like the tech angle got glossed a bit. The distinction isn’t just one of intensity in contemporary genre/trope usage.

Yeah, my take was definitely focused on media/literature/“genre”. “-punk” and “-core” have a different relationship in other non-music contexts, I’m sure.

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Mushroom themed scarfs are chic and vintage. Think Grace Kelly.
And for the mushroom keychain, I expect to be used for John Deere or Lamborghini tractor ignition keys.

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This strikes me as revisiting 60s/70s aesthetics. I grew up with flour/sugar/cocaine canisters in the shape of giant mushrooms. Unless my mom was goblincore and I didn’t know it.

So is this the new hotness? Gone are the days of slapping a brass gear onto something and calling it steam punk - now it’s slap a mushroom on it, and its goblincore?

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1_mgaiBH5V4jHGiqDiobNVWQ

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I get that reference!

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Needs more timeline

“ In prison jargon, “punks” are those inmates forced into a sexually submissive role. Whether straight or gay, their lives are lived in servitude to more aggressive inmates.”

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As long as we’re not also revisiting those ultra bold organically round typefaces that usually came with that aesthetic!

But this only reinforces my belief that a 70s revival is currently beginning to happen.

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Those and art deco-era are my favourite typefaces.

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So when I hot-glued gears to my welding goggles I achieved steampunkcore?

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ill_allow_it_community|nullxnull

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Also,

image

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No idea. But I am looking forward to the coming punkcore fad followed by a corepunk one.

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