Google bans "graphic nudity" from hosted blogs, will decide if your art is porn


#1

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#2

So the corporation that’s been compared to Game of Thrones in ruthlessness, excess and sexcapades is going to dictate morality? How quaint.

whore more:

http://www.businessinsider.com/eric-schmidt-spent-15-million-on-a-new-york-penthouse-2013-7?op=1

http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2013/may/26/silicon-valley-elite-san-francisco

I guess being a lapdog to the CIA, etc. has its benefits.

And, meanwhile…


#3

Meh. I’m okay with this.

The grocery store closest to where I live has a cork board that the public can post things on and they have a few rules. For example, everything has to have a date and the store reserves the right to remove anything for any reason. I’m guessing they would remove a posting with graphic nudity too.


#4

I don’t think anyone is denying that blogger is Google’s cork board. To be honest, this decision just strikes me as foolish. Google deciding to classify things as “having value” vs “pornography” is just asking for a whole heap of trouble.

It is certainly a reason some people might want to jump ship from blogger and get a different host.

In the meantime - and this question is for everyone - any blogs I should be checking before March 23?


Purina sued over claims it killed 4,000 dogs with 'toxic' food
#5

This guy claims he was told his blog is not in compliance:
http://www.modelmayhem.com/forums/post/941364
[this link is sfw, but it leads to a link that leads to what most would probably call ‘artistic nudity’ and not porn.]


#6

Sounds like Boing Boing should write an article on hosting your own blog


#7

Fortunately there’s enough third party programs out there to instantly convert your Blogger porn site to a Tumblr site.


#8

Oh motherfuckers. just as I’ve started to resurrect my own blog on their platform. It doesn’t affect me, really, since I’m not putting up nude photos (though that might help my traffic) but I’m mildly annoyed that Blogger is probably going to make it easy to take down blogs people don’t disagree with. It’s just as well, I’ve been thinking of migrating anyway.


#9

Sigh

Those pictures are pretty much exactly the kind my roommate uses to practice artistic figure drawing.


#10

[quote=“Chesterfield, post:3, topic:52453”]Meh. I’m okay with this. The grocery store closest to where I live has a cork board
[/quote]

Bad analogy. That cork board isn’t being viewed privately in your home, it’s being viewed in a grocery store where anyone can view it accidentally. That cork board doesn’t have a content warning before it opens for viewing by consenting adults. That cork board can’t be realistically monitored by responsible parents, etc. who set up CorkBoard™ accounts and monitor them for their kids.


#11

So, say I had a weblog with Google and I had images that (in my opinion) are not necessarily done with the purpose of titillation, but say, for the purpose of satire, and someone in a Google office somewhere, with an ironic mohican, decided it was porny, what website servers could I migrate to to not feel so censored, where someone else wouldn’t be the arbiter of what was porny or not? I mean besides the actual law of course. Obviously the argument about who decides what the difference between porn, exploitation and art is, is an old old debate.

What website servers are not arbited, potentially censored?


#12

Usually traditional web hosting companies care only about real law and real problems.

Unfortunately, while it is not that expensive and not that hard, the barriers are higher than with the usual major services.


#13

It’s a fine analogy. All the things you’ve mentioned - none of it matters. The cork board, digital or otherwise, is owned by a somebody else and you have to follow their rules to use it.

The place we are posting now has rules too.


#14

What website servers are not arbited, potentially censored?

Well, none really. If you want to post illegal content you are going to be in trouble just about anywhere.

If the content is legal, then you can post it on just about any website server that you pay for.


#15

Yes, but I don’t think anyone denies that.

I read the article as a warning to people who consider relying on Google products for their online presence but may not be fully aware of the implications.


#16

Cowicide was making the argument that Blogger is different than a cork board because… reasons!

I agree with you and the article. If you don’t care about stuff you produce on-line, go ahead and give it to a service that will use it to make money and will probably delete it at some point in the future.

If you want control over what you create, pay for hosting. It isn’t difficult nor is it expensive (I pay $3 / month for hosting and around $10 each year for my domain renewal).

.


#17

The cork board, digital or otherwise, is owned by a somebody else and you have to follow their rules to use it.

You’re shifting the goal posts a bit.

No one is denying that Google can have rules for its properties. And, no one is saying there shouldn’t be any rules against unlawful content, etc.

However, I think this is a shitty move by Google to limit yet another one of their services towards arbitrary censorship and being a control-freak with a service that portends to be a blog hosting company.

Same reason people complain about Facebook, etc. with their censorship within a service that portends a somewhat similar premise.

You may be comfortable with it, but I get disturbed when oligopolists start to practice censorship of this nature. Especially when those same oligopolists undercut and remove competition that increasingly limits choices for average consumers.


#18

Since The Great Goog in the Sky has deemed it necessary to inform me that my art does not meet their definition of what is artistic, I have deemed it necessary to change my definition of what blogging platform is worthy of my creativite efforts. No one gets to decide if my art is appropriate but me. Even the occasionally culturally challenging pieces I have produced are a very specific expression of my unique world view, and valid simply by their existence, just like any one else’s creative efforts. It appears it is time for me to get my own domain.
I wonder when they will decide what written content is appropriate. This is a slippery slope. Meet the new boss, same as the old boss.
Googbook can kiss my left tit. They can find it in my blog.


#19

Good for you! Take control for yourself. There are more options than ever before and it’s a great time to stop relying on platforms provided by advertising companies.


#20

remove competition that increasingly limits choices for average consumers

You’re kidding, right? There have never been more choices for the average consumer to make their voice heard.

If you want Google to pay for your speech, then it better be advertiser friendly because that’s their business model. If you don’t want to be supported by advertisers, then pay your own way.