Graduated shot glasses good for espresso


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2019/01/02/gradated-shot-glasses-good-for.html


#2

Big Lots has these, Anchor Hocking for $1.99 per piece. FYI…


#5

Yeah… for “espresso” shots… totally.

Just fill 'er up.


#7

Does it come in “bucket” sizes?


#8

Which is fortunate, because in my experience, they always seem to go missing after parties and get-togethers.


#10

If you’re measuring your espresso by volume, you’re doing it wrong.


#11

If you’re mixing drinks, its better to go with one of these:

Then you don’t have to keep checking the side to see if you’ve measured enough.


#12

Those shot glasses are amazing for measuring all sorts of stuff, from fuel additives to cocktail proportions and espresso shots. Just don’t put them in the dishwasher. I do not understand how they get away with calling them “dishwasher safe”. Two trips through a normal cycle and you will have lovely, clear, ungraduated shot glasses.


#13

Honestly if you’re pulling espresso, just weigh the coffee and the shots and then it’s more consistent (and honestly, easier because a readout on a digital scale is easier than the parallax effect when trying to read liquids). I do 18g of ground coffee and 36g of espresso afterward - I use small custard/prep bowls and a tiny little kitchen scale that is accurate to 1/10 of a gram for it, all the equipment is super cheap.

Weigh the coffee in the bowl on the scale, drop it in the grinder, tamp the portafilter and then put it on the machine. Use the bowl you weighed the beans in for the shots as well, just under the portafilter and over the scale. Start the extraction, wait for it to hit around 32g and then stop it, ends right about 36 every time.

https://www.amazon.com/Anchor-Hocking-Glass-4-Piece-Custard/dp/B009VNUULQ/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1546490794&sr=8-2&keywords=custard+bowl Something like this for the prep bowls, I have a pile of 'em I use for cooking and highly recommend to everyone.

For the scale: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0012N1NAA/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1 something like this. The reviews should all be either weed aficionados or cooks. :stuck_out_tongue:


#14

I wish they made etched versions of those. The painted ones always lose their lines after about a year of dishwashing. I’ve gotten so used to I just eyeball it these days; I know what a shot-glass holds and can estimate pretty well. You don’t need to be precise. Precision is for bakers.


#15

I’ve got the plastic version of this and it’s great. I came to suggest it but you got here first. I’ve thought about buying more (like 2-3 more) so I don’t always have to be washing up the one I have.


#16

I have one of these and never considered that they were to be used for measuring alcohol. I use it to measure vanilla essence and other small volume liquids for baking.


#17

I just fill 'er up and put it on the hot plate.


#18

I worked as a barista and honestly for espresso if you’re concerned over the quality of a pulled shot of espresso its important how fast/slow the shot is coming through (volume is typically going to be consistent unless you’ve majorly screwed something up) but more important is how the crema looks. Volume matters but not as much as the quality of the shot. If volume is super important, for something like baking then these are handy i suppose but they don’t seem particularly useful to me.


#19

I have the plastic set matching this and I think I may add some metal ones.

The plastic version gets etched and cloudy from measuring acidic liquids like lemon juice and vinegar. Still functional but seem to look dirty always.


#20

The stainless is nice for bar ware because it matches shakers and spoons and the like. It can be a little harder to read in dim lighting.


#21

Just use radioactive paint :smiley:


closed #22

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