GreenSavers are the best produce savers I've tried


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2017/05/09/greensavers-are-the-best-produ.html

After trying too many different options, I decided that GreenSavers [Amazon link] best met the twin goals of keeping veggies fresh while making the fridge navigable.


#2

They are a bit pricey, but I know from food industry folks that they work very well. On the pathogene & bacterial side, just be sure to date & identify / rotate / clean / reposition your food stuffs so as not to get any refrigerator mystery surprises.


#3

I’ve never tried these, but I do have the Rubbermaid Freshworks line. They gets 4.5 stars vs. 4 for the GreenSavers on Amazon, so there’s that.


#4

If I buy these, will my fridge get all clean like the one pictured?


#5

It’ll stay that way longer if you do it, is the thing.

This is why transparent’s so important. With the tupperware stuff we’re fine from an organization point of view, but we’d tend to forget what was what and have to reclutter everything finding it.


#6

We’ve starting using these recently for salad because something has changed in the distribution process that our grocer is using that is ruining fresh produce. Salad greens that once came in fresh are now coming in well on the way to soggy. I’m guessing that their refrigerator trucks are freezing the produce and then just left to thaw before stocking.So, Unless we put the salad in the saver right away all is lost.

We’re very happy that garden season is upon us and soon fresh greens from the backyard will be steps away and we will no longer rely on the grocer for greens.


#7

Just curious about how you will use the activated charcoal in yours after your filter expires - would you have to fashion a little bag out of cheesecloth to hold it, or have you come up with another idea?


#8

While I’ve never done so for this purpose, I have made charcoal (and baking soda) sachets using fillable teabags that are usually a few of dollars for 100. I find them to be useful for all kinds of stuff around the house.


#9

Hey! I thought it was just us that noticed this change.

What the hell is going on with greens transportation? Suddenly it seems like every grocery store we get prewashed greens from is destroying them somehow - they last for something like half the expected time.

Thankfully it’s almost farmers market time - the local farmers prewash greens, too, but they last literally weeks in the fridge, making it clear that, as you suspect, the issue is almost certainly distribution.


#10

I live alone, so I haven’t used greens in my salad since forever. They don’t keep well once you dress the salad-- or even that long beforehand.
Most of my salads can be described as “tomatoes and”.
I will tell you that there is nothing like a piece of romaine lettuce to perk up a tuna fish or bologna sandwich…


#11

Regarding airtight storage (which is pretty useful for several reasons), I use Lock&Lock boxes. They don’t have a full colander-style mesh inlet, but a roast-like grid to avoid excessive contract with the bottom.

I also use them for storage outside the fridge - haven’t had any bugs in my food in an long while, even in the tropics.

Big final plus: a layer of silica gel pearls under the grid makes them prefect for keeping stuff excessively dry. That was actually the first reason to get some…


#12

It used to be that way here (buy to use today or tomorrow … tops) but lately if I buy pre-washed greens in the grocery store, they last a pretty long time.

Our onions though … two feet in the grave the day before I buy them. It’s been like that for two or three years. I don’t buy more than one onion (or two if I’m making something big) at a time.


#13

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