Happy Mutants food topic

I’m intrigued…I did read in one of the pan reviews how the lamb’s head fell off during the Easter breakfast. That sound hilariously promising, if one wants to do a red velvet cake for a more macabre table setting…

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Or a raspberry jam filling…

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I’ve seen lamb failures where the cake didn’t rise well enough to fill the face, leaving a craggy blank where a soul should be.

My sister made a meatloaf in hers once.

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I am inspired by this. It’s tempting to whip up a meaty bundt sometime in the near future…

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ClutchLinkey has you covered

(Just in case you missed it! Post #3434, above)

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You had me at Sausage… :wink:

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Sounds dirty.

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So, I had this sassy response all typed up but then my curiosity got the better of me and I punched the recipe into google.

BEHOLD: it’s on Allrecipes and people have not only made it, but liked it.

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John Cusack Film GIF

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I could kind of see that. When I first posted, I meant it as a joke. But camping last month we tried doing sausage crumbles then pouring the pancake batter on top so it was an “all in one” breakfast, doused in maple syrup, and it was really good. I could see this being kind of like that.
The coffee and spices in the Bundt recipe turned me off, but I can kind of get it now.
Still not high on my “to make” list, but not wretch-worthy.

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Good work!

It sounds from the reviews that the sausage actually isn’t terribly noticeable in it… Which I think we guessed upthread, IIRC, what with the spices and raisins and nuts…

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The Chef Recreating 18th-Century Recipes From a Thrift-Shop Find.

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BtW. What is your oldest Cookbook? My first choice is a great reference book from 1911. The Grocers Encyclopedia. Perhaps not a cookbook, but explaining ( in 750 pages! ) all you need to know to run a grocery store at the turn of last century. Full of illustrations and photos of food items an the the facts about them.
From Abalone to Zwetschenwasser(?)

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My oldest is a children’s cookbook from the late '80s. This is the one that got me started. When I emigrated to the states it was one of the few things I brought with me.

I also have a cookbook that I got in Bosnia in 1996. The recipes are from the spouses of deployed soldiers to provide a tast of home. There’s also recipes from various government officials, and even a cookie recipe from Hillary Clinton. This is not my copy, the cover was destroyed years ago.
1029788942.0.m

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Estate sale find, first edition printed 1970:

First cookbook I bought myself in the early 90s at WaldenBooks:

My mother’s go-to cookbook, given to her by now distant cousins, full of clippings and notes,printed 1963:

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Physically oldest, a neighbor gave me his mother’s German cookbook, looks to be from the 40s. And we recently got my great grandmother’s cookbook of some sort that may be older, haven’t poked it with a stick yet. Also have 2 copies now of Mary Margaret McBride’s Encyclopedia of Cooking. A 12 volume set, and a later omnibus edition. I believe it was originally published in the 50’s as a supermarket premium. And there are some community cookbooks from the 40’s on floating around, and loads of old recipe cards and hand written recipes we pull out of my grandmother’s house when she passed.

I also have a facsimile copy of an Irish cookbook from the 18th century, and a compilation/modernization of 15th century recipes then current in England called “To The Kings Taste”. And a recent edition of the Fanny Farmer cookbook.

J Townsend sells 18th and 19th century cook books as well, I have been gifting them to people.

https://www.townsends.us/collections/cookbooks

Cookbooks don’t really go back much further than that. We have older recipes of course, and even recipe compilations here and there. But the modern cookbook starts pretty late.

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@ClutchLinkey & @DukeTrout
My lamb cake:

I have an ancient cast iron mold. Until it was passed down to me, I used the Nordicware aluminum one. I prefer the cast iron, although it is MUCH heavier to move about; it cooks more evenly and gives a sharper impression.

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Oh yes! I had a cook book for kids too! The first recipe I learned was ‘ Sloppy Joe’s’. Mmmm, now I want Sloppy Joes.

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I am going to seek this out over the weekend. :slightly_smiling_face:

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That sounds awesome!

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