Here is the first astonishing image from the James Webb Telescope

Warning: Objects in Webb Mirror are closer than they appear.

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Actually, due to cosmic expansion over the last 14 or so billion years, they are much, much farther away than they appear. :grin:

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fine, if you want to throw science at me.

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meh… its not going to replace my cat as the background on my iPhone… so why do they bother?

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Yeah, but what about your cat’s iPhone background?

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I like big clusters and I cannot lie…

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I clicked to say the exact same thing. I couldn’t unsee the Doctorr Who graphic come together in front of my eyes.

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Well, we could have a bar showing a unit of angles we know how big it is. Peak sensitivities in nm for what is shown in the RGB channels. Hard to quite brightness in meaningful units, but we sort-of know how a galaxy is supposed to look.

The webbtelescope.org image pages have the information on which filters were used and what colors they were mapped to. They also tell the plate scale.
Scroll to the bottom of this page for all the details.
Southern Ring Nebula (NIRCam and MIRI Images Side by Side)

The general public doesn’t know enough about the details of infrared astronomy to make use of that information. That’s why it’s at the bottom of the page.

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Here’s the Ars write-up, giving a thumbnail at least of what we are seeing.

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Here’s a neat YouTube short video explaining why the diffraction spike patterns are different between JWST and Hubble’s images:

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Astrophysicist Dr. Brian May and 10cc founder Graham Gouldman released a song today to mark the first images.

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My favourite joke from this was that it proves the monkeys and typewriters theory: give the universe 13bn years and it will eventually replicate a frame from a low-budget animation…

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Wanna watch an astrophysicist absolutely enthralled?

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full of stars

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telescope-space1

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Is this from the 2001 or from Ready Player One!

Yes! Based on the image data, can the actual locations of the gravitational lens “distorted” galaxies be determined and thereby be shown “correctly”, however simply in some graphic?

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