Homeland wins Copper Cylinder award for best Canadian YA sf novel


#1

[Permalink]


#2

Looks like a Copper Pipebomb award. Caution when traveling. :stuck_out_tongue:
That said, congratulations! :smiley:


#3

I was gonna say the same thing.

Who designed this award? Even putting aside the silly “OMGTEHBOMBZ” nonsense that has become part of our culture, it’s not a very aesthetically pleasing form. Couldn’t they have picked something that looks less like they just went to Home Depot and grabbed a pipe off a shelf to have etched?

It’s a literature award - if we’re sticking with the same basic shape, why not something like this instead?


#4

Congratulations Cory! The award has a nice industrial aesthetic, though they missed a bet by not going with steampunk. I like the original design, too.

http://coppercylinderaward.ca/node/11

This Roycroft one would have been cool as well.


#5

This, in turn, looks somewhat like made from an artillery shell. WW1 trench art looked pretty similar.


#6

The Roycroft one? I seriously doubt it. I’m familiar with artillery brass trench art, and it was made of… brass. That one is copper.

http://treasure-broker.com/product/roycroft-hammered-copper-cylinder-vase/

https://www.google.com/search?q=roycroft+cylindrical+copper+vase&tbm=isch

https://www.google.com/search?q=roycroft+hammered+copper+vase&tbm=isch

You need to watch some more episodes of The Antiques Roadshow. :smirk:


#7

Copper is the chief component of brass, and it should come as no surprise that because of this they share a great many qualities and similarities.

And whether copper or brass, the design does look an awful lot like an artillery shell converted into art, in the vein of the trench art in question - in particular as many such pieces have flat, truncated tops like this design, and vertical etching and decorations like this design.

That said, even the Taylor design looks good, for being so very simplistic.


#8

That’s definitely one way of looking at it, if kind of a superficial one.

This stuff obviously has more significance to me than most people because I spent years as a fairly serious student of non-ferrous metalworking. I researched the craft, studied what people had done with metal since ancient times, and saw how much of it I could reproduce with simple tools.

I’m still involved with studying different aspects of it on a daily basis 30 years later, but due to health reasons I am very limited to what I can actually make these days. If you look at my posting history I am definitely more interested in the maker-type stuff submitted here than the political bullshit, the latest Internet fads, etc.

@Medievalist seems to be more fully immersed in the hands-on aspect of the craft than I am these days, and I always enjoy reading his well-informed views on the subject. You make good posts on other subjects, ones that sometimes hold less interest for me. I find myself posting less and less frequently here these days, but on the rare occasion that a metalworking discussion pops up I admittedly get a little TOO enthusiastic sometimes,

And I agree about the Taylor design.


#9

There is nothing like “too” enthusiastic when it comes to metals (and gemstones).


#11

I dunno - you might want to draw the line at eatting them.


#12

dat award iz da bomb! (darn beaten to the punch, oh well.)

congrats on the award and recognition, you deserve it!


#13

The award gets its name (and shape, but apparently not proportions) from Canada’s first homegrown sci-fi book, A Strange Manuscript Found in a Copper Cylinder, by James De Mille, ca.1880s. Here’s the cylinder’s description from the book:

[quote]The article in question was made of metal and was cylindrical in shape. It was soldered tight and evidently contained something. It was about eighteen inches long and eight wide. The nature of the metal was not easily perceptible…

They all looked, and could see, where the knife had cut into the vessel, that it was as he said. It was copper.[/quote]


#14

Ah! Neat!


#15

Master Cylinder!

Xander Crews: Hey, my penis fills an entire tall-boy.


#16

#17


#18

I hadn’t seen that one, that is great. :slight_smile:


#19
...I always enjoy reading his well-informed views on the subject.

I enjoyed looking at those google results for Roycroft you linked, so we can call it even.


#20

This topic was automatically closed after 5 days. New replies are no longer allowed.