How can we help crush the GOP in 2020?

Really interesting Tweetstorm:

TL;DR

The GOP needs to be crushed in 2020 so that a center-right party can arise from the ashes.

I regret not taking this stuff more seriously in 2016, but I am taking it very seriously now. And by serious I mean applying as much money as I can. The total amount I spent on politics in my entire life prior to 2016 was $0.

So the question is, where are the best and most effective places we can send money to help crush the GOP in 2020, absolutely in the presidency, but also across the board in every remotely competitive race?

So far I’ve got this:

Where else can we effectively apply money to crush these idiots?

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There is already a center-right party in the US. It’s called the Democratic Party.

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I agree with that, although they’re making gestures in a leftward direction, which Dem establishment is doing its best to quell. That center-right assertion really stood out.

I’m attempting to influence family friends and neighbors by non-confrontationally stating my beliefs about policy questions, while trying to avoid framing it as us vs. them, D’s vs. R’s.

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Any other suggestions of places we can send $ that will be effective in helping to crush the GOP in 2020? This is literally free money folks. Chime in.

Also, am I a bad person for praying :pray: that we have a giant recession during the election? I don’t feel this is a partisan thing; the president, whoever it is, always gets blamed for the current economic conditions even though the president has very little direct control over the economy.

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Start locally. Support your local dem party via school board elections, city councils, county supervisors, state representatives. state senators etc…

Erode the GoP foundation in your state until it collapses.

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Stuff like this is so damn depressing, but I feel like all we can do is focus on removing Trump and the GOP to get where we need to go…

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I don’t think there’s much future for the Republican party in California already:

https://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/capitol-alert/article223378470.html

When asked how Republicans combat all these woes, and what they need to do to turn out their own voters, Issa got on an elevator and remained silent until the doors closed.

I love that paragraph.

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A useful tool for voters: Tracking Congress in the Age of Trump


#Resist

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That tool seems needlessly nuanced, compared to the observed benchmark of “is this a republican? if so, vote against them.”

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Just find tight senatorial races and contribute to the D. Maximum impact will be to wait until after the primaries, though. The DSCC usually has this information available (though don’t contribute to the DSCC, nor to the DCCC). I say “Senate” and not “House”, because that’s where we need the big win this year.

Tight races often involve a conservative Democrat, so you will need to be able to not worry about their ideology.

I usually “adopt” a district, Senate or House, outside my area and contribute strongly to a single candidate. For example, in 2005 Melissa Bean, a pretty conservative Democrat, had a slim chance to beat Phil Crane in the Illinois 8th. Crane was one of the worst people ever in the GOP, even by today’s standards; back in the 70s I had actively worked for a candidate against him in the 13th district. I didn’t like Bean, and had I lived in the district I would probably have supported one of her opponents in the primary, but thanks to contributions from individual donors like me the DCCC finally decided to risk some national money on her (despite the 8th being a “safe” R seat), and she won.

Incidentally, the 8th has been held by Democrats for all but 2 years since then, including by the person who coined the nickname “corporal bone spurs”.

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Agree completely, we need to publicize these races and raise as much money as possible from the entire USA

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I’m not sure who the “we” would be – the principals of this blog are usually pretty clear on candidates they support – but in any event the general elections are way off. It isn’t a bad time to get behind people for the primaries, if that’s what one wants to do, but the biggest impact for national policy is after the primaries, once candidates have been selected, and in any event I think the Democrats in a given district have the right to pick their local nominee for themselves. Outside money – whether it is from the DCCC or ActBlue – is often supporting an agenda which is uninformed w/r to the local needs.

(Last election @doctorow blogged about giving money to a candidate in my district. I understand that some of his rhetoric and positions made him attractive to someone from the outside, but he was someone I’ve known for years and who I wouldn’t trust to walk my dog; the donation kind of pissed me off.)

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Donating to this race, which is apparently in 17 days, the weird NC one

https://www.danmccready.com

https://ballotpedia.org/North_Carolina's_9th_Congressional_District_special_election,_2019

Also

I didn’t mention any presidential candidates yet, for a reason. The other races I linked are all senate and house, aren’t they?

Primaries are also for Senate and House races. The race you linked in NC is a special election and the primary is past, so seems a reasonable place to donate. In the elections you linked earlier, Scholten seems to be running unopposed. I think there’s still time for a primary opponent to McGrath, though I doubt one will materialize.

It will be really hard to beat McConnell next year, in part because voters won’t want to lose the clout he has. The more likely way to reduce his power is to demote him to Minority Leader. However, it is always worth a shot, and McGrath seems like a strong candidate. If nothing else, it might force McConnell to publicly address issues he likes to duck.

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If you can donate to this race, please do. :tangerine: :clown_face: needs to lose everything he touches.

:arrow_right: donate at https://www.danmccready.com/

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Sadly, that didn’t go through.

Republican Dan Bishop pulled off a narrow victory in a closely-watched North Carolina special congressional election

Bishop is a critic of LGBTQ rights who once compared gay rights activists to the Taliban, and spearheaded North Carolina’s so-called “bathroom bill,” which banned transgender people from using public restrooms otherr than those designated for their biological sex as defined on their birth certificates.