HOWTO make a bike-charged emergency battery


#1

[Permalink]


#2

I can’t watch the video because the power is out at my house. Thanks for nothing.


#3

Interesting charge controller. I designed a very similar one, independently, for charging my bike stereos’ Li-ion packs with a solar panel. I had no idea that design could win an award.


#4

I can’t watch because it reminds me of Soylent Green.


#5

Ok, I just watched it. It’s really good! He sounds like Robert Downey doing Tony Stark.
I liked the bits about ‘decoration through age and decay’ and ‘civilized executions’.


#6

This is actually just what we need for our art studio/boat/place we store our bikes in winter. Thanks, BoingBoing!


#7

Hackett is pretty excellent. And I like that, with the exception of the charging circuit, everything is simple enough that it can just be explained, without the need for an instructible. For the exception, here’s a link for the lazy.

I will place this project in my queue, which, since I now have a four-month-old at home, means it will be completed in approximately 2030. Good thing I live in Boston, so no chance of electricity ever going out by flood, or snow, or rain, or tree limbs, or…!


#8

Here’s something similar http://diorealskills.org/2012/12/20/bike-power-version-2-field-test/ but using a 300W electric bicycle wheel rectifier (and solar battery charger for charging batteries) For reference it takes many hours to charge a single (42Ah) car battery.


#9

Given the various inefficiencies, and what an average person can output, you might get 100 Watts output for an hour before you tire. That’s 0.1 kWh, which you might be able to do a few times a day, if you’re fit. A typical fridge uses about 5 kWh a day, so I don’t see it being all that useful for that application, at least. For a few CFL bulbs, sure.


#10

This topic was automatically closed after 5 days. New replies are no longer allowed.