I've had my Kindle Voyage for over a year now, and I love it


#1

[Read the post]


#2

My only complaint about the Kindle is the way Amazon handles personal documents (files I make myself). They lose the cover art and whispersync is broken (I’m talking about the function that lets me resume reading at the same position on a different device).

I wish Amazon would let me upload epub files or at least azw/azw3 files. I end up using Calibre to convert the files to the mobi format and usually lose something in the process.


#3

Mine is that Bezos announced a new one as I wrote that post. :slight_smile:


#4

I have read conjecture that Amazon may never upgrade the 300 pixel-per-inch screen, because it is enough to convince the human eye it is reading solid, ink on paper words, rather than assembled dots.

On paper, that’s the assumption for process color. For B&W, though, it’s 600 DPI.


#5

Evolutionary changes? Does that mean after a million years it now comes in a slightly lighter color? Or did he mean revolutionary?


#6

You can buy the model with ads and if you can’t live with them you can pay $20 later to disable them.


#7

But now you can buy a new one, write a new post, and be able to justify writing off the expense of the Kindle to the IRS.


#8

Pretty much, but I really don’t need a new one. Maybe if I give one to my kid…


#9

I’ve said elsewhere that if my Voyage and my iPad both broke (say in the same drop to the floor) that I would run out to replace my Voyage. Not so much my iPad. I read for hours every day and the Voyage is a joy. I got into e-reading with Sony’s early offerings and never looked back. My wife remains hooked on dead tree books and refuses to make the switch.

I admit I enjoy the smell and feel of browsing in a book store but that is a small price to pay for carrying around a near-library of books in one hand with a built in light a couple weeks of battery life.


#10

As a borderline hoarder1 I find it very helpful to be able to read a book that I don’t intend to read again without having to go through the anguish of getting rid of the physical book once I’m finished.

1: I mean that I’m a person with an anxiety disorder who has a mild aversion to getting rid of things, not a person with BPD and also a hoarder.


#11

I’m on a Kindle Fire HD 6, but 95% of what I use it for is reading anyway. I like

  • the ability to check out books from the library without actually having to go to the library
  • getting books for free, through Amazon First and the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library and Bookbub notifications
  • being able to hold an 800-page book in whatever awkward lying-in-bed position I happen to be in, in one hand, without tiring
  • being able to bring whatever I want to read to work, without people asking about it or judging my choices
  • not having to find as much space on my overcrowded shelves (I still do acquire plenty of used and discount and must-have books)

#12

I’ve been using the BN nook for awhile. I’m not in love with the hardware. I’d consider a kindle but… what sort of effort am I looking at to get my nook purchases onto that device? I assume I need to strip drm and convert the format?


#13

Truth. That Amazon Origami case is absolute crap. It’s odd because the previous non-origami official Amazon cases were quite good. But the official Origami one is awful, and expensive too!

I too love the hell out of my Voyage. A new one is coming??


#14

The effort isn’t trivial.

You need to set up and configure Calibre. The hard part is getting the DRM stripping to work. There’s lots written about it online and it’s been years since I went through it, so I’m not going to try to describe the process.

Once you have everything set up, you should be able to plug in your Nook, Calibre will recognize it and import all the files. Then you should be able to do a bulk convert to mobi format that the Kindle can display.

The DRM-stripping process is worth going through even for people that buy all books from Amazon. The DRM lets Amazon remotely remove the book from your device. If you strip the DRM, then you have a backup copy that Amazon can’t touch.


#15

I traded up to a Paperwhite recently and am very satisfied.


#16

There are several websites that will convert epub to mobi. I hear.


#17

http://www.epubconverter.com/epub-to-mobi-converter/


#18

Myself, I come from reading books on electronic devices since the PalmPilot.

I resisted e-ink for a long time due to the crappy black/white refresh every page. But once that got improved to once every 6/7 pages, I bought a lovely Kobo H2O. Big screen, frontlit, best in class.

And for almost a year it has been bliss reading on it. I cannot live without an e-ink reader anymore.

Except: my Kobo just broke. Everything seems to work (touchscreen, frontlight), but the screen won’t refresh. It’s stuck on the ‘sleeping’ screen :frowning:

Still … I’ll replace it with another H2O. Big highrez screen AND water resistant … can’t beat that.


#19

Wait, ads? In what context do the ads appear? I prefer to buy books in paper format, but I do have an increasingly large list of public domain books I’ve been downloading for which I’ve thought about buying an e-reader.


#20

The home screen tries to sell you books, that’s all.