Kindle Voyage


#1

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#2

I haven’t looked at the voyage just yet since I’m at work, but how does it compare to the paperwhite tablet? Don’t know if Amazon is offering a new paperwhite or is the voyage is its new replacement. If so I’d like to still know how they stack up against each other.


#3

Yes. The paperwhite has been good to me and is probably ‘good enough’ by most metrics, but an actual print-resolution ‘retina’ e-ink display sounds mighty tempting.


#4

Except for the price I have been eying the Boox, I worry the B&N Nook and Kindle are reading me as much as I read it. I think the Nooks are all very dumbed down/disabled Android, I think Kindle is a customized Linux distro but locked away form the user AFAIK with unknown processes running, Books has an custom Linux distro as do several Chinese e-ink readers.
The voyage looks to be what I had hoped an e-ink reader would be, if only it was reflashable to something 100% OSS.


#5

The paperwhite is now the mid-range model, $80 cheaper. The new one is thinner, has a higher ppi, more even lighting, and this textured glass business.


#6

The cheapest tablet they offer is $99 but only with their bullshit advertising thing stuck on it. It’s $114 without that.


#7

Interestingly, UK Amazon doesn’t list a ‘With special offers’ version of the Voyage. It isn’t totally missing from Uk Kindles, seems to be an option on at least the base Fire model.

That said, the usual huge UK mark up for the same product is present and correct:
Voyage Wi-Fi only: $277
+3G: $375(!)


#8

Looks like UK kids cannot be trusted/are more clumsy compared to US kids too!


#9

Looks nice, but as with any reader, the proof is in the day-to-day use.
Looks like they’ve adopted similar side page turn buttons to the Nook which is nice. Yeah, I’m aware Kindles have always had side buttons, but these look more like the Nook ones than traditional Kindle ones.
The screen concept sounds interesting, but I’d want to see before buying. And the Amazon walled garden just isn’t acceptable to me any more.
That and my Nook Simple Touch Glowlight is proving itself to be a simple yet tough device, especially for the budget price.

Wake me up when someone releases a tough, hi-res, open and ultimately colour e-ink device.


#10

Still no native ePub support. I would switch from my aging Nook to a Kindle if they would make this one change.


#11

Looks like it’s time to upgrade from my original Fire.


#12

For fiction reading, my paperwhite is great. I 'll probably keep it until it dies.

However, I’d love to see a standard page size kindle for reading PDFs (manuals, etc). I could probably convince work to buy some if they kept the price within a reasonable range ($300-400). The old Kindle DX was along the right path.


#13

Totally agree. A large format (A4) Kindle would be great for any technical books with diagrams and the like. They often tend to be rather heavy books.

I believe it is still possible to get the Kindle DX? Although I remember some problematic reviews, which put me off.


#14

I’ll say what I always say when it comes to Amazon electronics: They don’t stand behind them when they do fail, even if they’ve caused the failure.

Happened to me with a second gen kindle - bought the case that went along with it, daughter gets born, miss the recall myself but notice a problem (cases were causing some shorts) - when I finally get enough breathing room to deal with it and realized it was a recall - SOL. Nothing Amazon would do.
They apparently thought having 50+ of their titles would keep me as a customer.

I unlocked them all, went to Nook, and will not buy another Amazon electronics device.


#15

I argued for a Kindle but they pointed out that if it could be associated with me, then the information bleed—Amazon logging every page turn and annotation—was a potential security hazard. Not to mention the darker esoteric potential of spending too much time staring at a device controlled by a secretive billionaire in Seattle. The void stares also, and so on.

The Rhesus Chart


#16

I’m getting back into teh swing of devouring books and have been thinking of getting an e-paper device…
What’s the dealio? Amazon raiding your stats undercuts the positives of the better device? Can’t you just root the thing?


#17

This looks really sweet to me. But my 1st generation Paperwhite continues to function so well. Oops, looks like I just dropped my PW…

Aside from liking any resolution, contrast, lighting improvements I also would enjoy the no-recess screen. I’m forever picking bits of stuff out of the edges and corners since I often read while eating.


#18

Calibre? It’s not as ideal as native support, but it’s done the job for converting epub, lit and the like into the mobi files that Kindle reads.


#19

Enough with the walled garden /no-ePub argument; the Kindle can be sideloaded with content in other open formats directly, by emailing documents through Amazon, or using third-party software easily enough. It’s not a walled garden.


#20

I don’t like the way Calibre wants to take over my eBook collection. I have a very specific directory and file naming system that isn’t dependent on a particular app.