Little boy meets Mickey Mouse 'in real life' for the first time

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2019/08/29/little-boy-meets-mickey-mouse.html

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I was much the same the first time I met Mickey at Disneyland. I was 31 years old. Oh, the memories.

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Thanks. We all need something like that these days.

That cast member is also very impressive when it comes to connecting non-verbally with a little kid.

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don’t indoctrinate your children to be pro disney

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Complete opposite for my niece when she met Goofy in Disneyland. Oh, the bawling!

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I love you, corporate logo!

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The Disney Corp. may be flaming assholes, Mickey may feel like plastic but a sweet little kid gave a great hug to whoever was in the costume and that all this needs to be about. Little kids give the best hugs in the world because it comes from their hearts. You’ve got a great little guy, I hope he has many more happy discoveries as he explores his world.

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The Disney logo never got drunk and hit me…

The Disney logo never got drunk and hit me…

That costs extra

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Though I wonder about the level of enthusiasm here. My gut feeling is that it wasn’t a spontaneous discovery of a strange and friendly creature for him, but him meeting a celebrity, based on a huge amount of hours in from of the TV.

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Also for my partner’s god-daughter when she met Minnie Mouse. She was expecting something, well, mouse-sized, so was terrified by something bigger than an adult human, with a giant head.

But this video is indeed sweet. Putting aside cynicism about Disney or corporate marketing, this was plainly wonderful for the child.

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I love the sweet little guy, and I’m glad this was such a good experience for him.

If I was a parent in my current financial situation, I would be crying for days knowing that my kids would never have an experience like that.

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Yes, those parents (or these days, unseen grandparents) sprung mightily from their pocketbooks to make this event happen. That breakfast meal for was easily US$200 for a family of four.

In order for Disneyland to keep its magic, you can’t go there often. Go there too much and the pixie dust starts to wear off quickly. Yes, the attention to detail is always amazing, but the overall experience is diminished. In this vein, then, this family should not visit there for at least another ten years.

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Do kids really care if it’s Minnie, Mickey, or any other delightful mascot focusing on and hugging them? Unless advertising and media implanted the idea that only A-class cartoon characters (or Santa Claus) are worthy of consideration?

I mean, how old is that kid? 3, 4 years? It’s unlikely that they will even remember the incident, even with film evidence.

Don’t criticize people for liking things or letting their kids enjoy things.

In my experience: yes, quite a lot, and in a much purer, simpler way than adults do.

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Is that a board rule, or just like your opinion man?

That boy may grow up to be abused by their internship program if they let that loose talk go to far.

https://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=128490886

There’s a big difference between berating someone because they like Star War not Star Trek and teaching your child to revere a company that exploits everyone in it from top to bottom.

Your child is not entitled to a fun day at the expense of thousands of downtrodden workers.

No, it’s more Wheaton’s Law, something more people should take to heart.

Oh, give me a break. I know it’s fashionable to imagine that Disney “exploits and abuses” the entire world, somehow, despite agreeing to raise wages company-wide and working to hugely improve employee benefits, being one of the biggest employers in Florida. Large corporations are handy punching bags.

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Since you cut a part of the question, I’m not quite sure with you agree with the part that they are basically told by media whom to revere and whom not.

Does this include giving them access to an unlimited amount of sugar?

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i came here to escape the corn cobs, please, sir, stop

No, I disagree. I think “the media” (movies, books, tv, etc) presents parents tons of options on what properties to amuse their kids with; kids also do a good job of choosing by themselves who or what to revere. “The media” doesn’t force kids to revere any characters. Heck, my young niece is obsessed with Spider-Man (classic old school Spidey, not the modern movies), and my nephew loves dinosaurs pretty much exclusively. Neither one really cares for Disney stuff all that much, despite watching lots of it as little kids.

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