Man crashes large boat into another docked boat, gets charged with boating under the influence

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2020/10/19/man-crashes-large-boat-into-another-docked-boat-gets-charged-with-boating-under-the-influence.html

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MAGA!

Got a pretty good idea about his family’s income level.

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Obligatory (Ted Knight + Rodney Dangerfield never fail to make me laugh)

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Again, any idiot can turn a key - all it takes to make a stinkpot go. As opposed to a sailboat, where one does not get very far without knowing what the fuck is going on.

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Very first thought. Thanks for meeting my expectations.

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I mean, looks parked to me, what’s the issue?

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His seamanship badge is going to be revoked.

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You seem to be an expert …
Do you know what it takes to set sail in a harbor (or similar setting like in the video) to get out out to open sea?
I’ll leave out the questions/problem regarding wind/direction/placement of boat/amount of (experienced) crew/traffic … Imagine two sailboats, one with the right of way under sails on a narrow stretch in a canal, both boats longer than half the width of the canal and some motorboats present also. What a fun moment to start filming …

I’m 100% with you when it comes to preferring sailboats, quite nothing like it! But in this particular case your argument is quite weak

Most sailboats of any significant size have auxiliary engines for this purpose. While it’s not impossible to use your sails for maneuvering around harbors and docks, it’s not very practical.

Maritime rules do say that motor boats should always give right of way to sailboats though. However, a sailboat under engine power is considered a motor boat.

Also, after watching the video, it’s very obvious this chucklehead has no idea how to drive a boat.

Full reversing out of his slip and still running full power even after plowing into the dock and the other boat. Unless the throttle was stuck he must have been totally out of his gourd and barely able to stand or function to act like that.

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White people problems (and I don’t want to hear about your black friend that owns a fishing boat).

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Why am I unsurprised to see a Trump 2020 flag flying from the bridge?

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I held a USCG 100-ton aux sail all-oceans ship’s master’s license, have sailed professionally and in international competitions, so I think that does give me some credence. As @MikeKStar pointed out, no sailor worth her or his salt would be sailing into a narrow channel. Most any sailboat one might be able to sleep on has a motor, either inboard or outboard, specifically in order to be able to maneuver. That being said, sailing on or off the mooring is a skill still practiced in even the biggest boats, and kind of fun. Here’s a Maine coastal schooner coming in to a small harbor without benefit of engine power: https://sailinganarchy.com/2020/10/12/you-cant-do-it/

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Yup. Growing up we had a part-lease on a 32-footer, and it was years before I was allowed to single-hand it in and out of the mooring. Even then someone else was on board. The first time I brought it into the slip under sail was a proud moment. And I was only allowed to do it when there was no other traffic, even though by then I’d been sailing that boat for a long time.

The only thing I’d qualify (not disagree with) about “motor boats should always give right of way to sailboats” is that “and as a sailboat, assume that they won’t.”

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You scratched my anchor!

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“Most motorboaters are idiots, so expect them to be.”

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Apparently, four years is too short a wait before making a clone.

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I’d say that the chances that he would have a Trump 2020 flag were at least 10 to 1.

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Maybe I’m prejudiced toward sail but I let out a breath of relief when I saw him miss the yachts and hit another launch!

Your generalisation about motorboat user skill vs sailor skill holds up to my experience. I’m yet to see a single-hander warp a large motorboat out of a marina or deftly scull one into a berth.

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(Umm, ok? I think I’m a bit confused by your usage, but seem to be in general agreement.)