Model behavior for evolving the best and most loving mutants


#1

##a voluntary code of conduct for navigating the bbs system

post your own personal ethos that guides you to help make this a better place

it can be long or short, pithy or straightforward

keep it sincere and focused on nurturing

rules define the minimum standard of behavior, voluntary codes of conduct are aspirational and help us continue to travel towards excellence


A Modest Proposal to Amend the Community Rules
#2

#3

Do not doubt the sincerity of another mutant’s beliefs (unless they are clearly being snarkastic).

Instead, figure out from what perspective they may be looking to make their sentiment true to them.


#4

Try and employ more empathy for others. Even those you disagree with.

Also, when someone in the community speaks up against a troll of some sort (usually a sexist or racist one), show that person support and speak out against those things too. Show that they are not acceptable at all.

We can probably all do better to remember that since this is a digital community and not a face to face one, we can often miss the social cues we normally rely on to share jokes and the like. Try to be more explicit when snarking or joking, if it can be misconstrued as something it’s not.


#5

#Take a break, for safety’s sake.


#6

Treat others as you would treat @OtherMichael.


#7

That’s mean, man. I don’t want everyone to cut me.

Also, I know many of these observations will necessarily be self-evident and things that shouldn’t need to be repeated since they’re so damned obvious, but as much as I possibly can, unless it’s an endless thread like Questions or similar (that is, if it’s a thread borne from a single post rather than an ongoing, rambling discussion), I make every effort to read the whole damned thing before posting.

Also, I haven’t yet tired of giving the benefit of the doubt. But I understand why that isn’t always possible.


#8

Ya, I probably take a too Pollyanna perspective on the intentions of others…


#9

Dense, trollish posters are not conversationalists. At best, they are grindstones for your writing skills. At worst, they are a waste of your time.


#10
  1. Stay Alert
  2. Trust No One
  3. Keep Your Laser Flag Handy

#11

always know where your towel is, it may be employed as a flag


#12

This button is your friend

please use it!

Think of it as a “hmm, let’s take a closer look” button where if there is no harm, there is no foul.

(we did move it behind the ellipsis, so try there if you haven’t before)


#13

Flagged.


#14

Double-flagged.


#15

Your technical implementation is not used as a first-line intervention because there is insufficient transparency in how flags are reviewed.

Transparency drives engagement.

Since many of the regulars are pretty transparent and consistent, I just talk to them first about it. Almost all the time in the clear and not via PMs.


#16

my secret to networking is not knowing it all

it’s having someone else in my life as passionate as you are about your thing


#17

the computer is your friend.


#18

A spoonful of sugar helps your own medicine go down.


#19

I give myself very good advice but I seldom follow it. Here are some general rules I try to stick to:

• Avoid unnecessary, obscure, or ridiculous literary allusions, paraphrases, or vague references.
• Never a borrower be without giving due credit, but lend freely for imitation is the sincerest form of flattery.
• Be colloquial but never vulgar except in those cases where extreme fucking emphasis is needed.
• Add to the conversation. If all you’re doing is paraphrasing what’s been said a like will suffice.
• Be generous with likes but do not give them without reading carefully and thoughtfully first. Assume the ones you give mean as much as the ones you receive.

• This, above all else: to thine own comments be true. Never edit except to add or clarify. And it follows as the night does the day thou canst not be false to any mutant.


#20

Triple-flagged.