Model of Ancient Rome fills room


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2018/04/17/model-of-ancient-rome-fills-ro.html


#2

Septimus Severus’s one filled a large outside wall…


#3

Oh that is so fake! The real ancient Rome was way, way bigger, you could walk around inside it!


#4

Rome wasn’t built in a day. . . in fact you can’t even build a scale model of Rome in a day, it takes at least four years!


#5

Anyone know the Latin for “What is this, a Rome for ants?”


#6

I’ve always wanted to be a city planner.

Seriously- would love to see that!


#7

All roads lead to Rome.


#8

Not an ant, but meet the Red Roman (AKA camel spider, but not really a spider either)…


#9

Stanford, of course, went upstream and unleased the nerds

This site presents 1,186 of the surviving fragments and 87 fragments known only from Renaissance drawings in a fully searchable database. Each entry includes digital color photographs and 3D models, a search box, a description of the fragment, an analysis of its significance and a review of the scholarly literature.
https://formaurbis.stanford.edu/index.html


#10

What’s the Latin for “Hell, no!” ?


#11

Will this do?


#12

“Quid est hoc, a Roma alta formicae petunt?”

If it is wrong, blame Google.


#13

you don’t know what a marvel the pantheon in rome is till you see and contrast the exterior with the interior


#14

Hmm, too large for 6mm and too small for 7mm; evidently not intended as war games terrain. What a missed opportunity.

@sarc I think that the technical, archaeological, architectural way of referring to the Pantheon is, “Ohmahgawd awesomeballs!”


#15

OK, this is insane

HISTORY OF FRAGMENT
Like the majority of FUR fragments, this piece was discovered in 1562 in a garden behind the Church of Saints Cosmas and Damian. From here, it was transferred to the Palazzo Farnese and stored there. The fragment was later used as building material in the 17th-c. construction of the Farnese family’s Giardino Segreto (“Secret Garden”) near the Via Giulia, and was rediscovered in 1888 or 1898 when the walls of the garden were demolished.

This is what it’s going to sound like in the future when archivists describe our storage media. “This text was created on a Mac Sysytem 7 using Word Perfect and stored on a 100Mb Zip drive. At some point it was transerred to series of optical media (eventually a comapact disk) and presumably lost. It was rediscovered in 2049 when a Bladerunner destroyed a wall, exposing the disk.”

https://formaurbis.stanford.edu/fragment.php?slab=81&record=13


#16

Mussolini commissioned a model of Rome as it appeared at the time of Constantine (AD 306-337), when the city had reached its greatest size

Size over quality. Rome was no longer the capital of the Roman Empire at that time; Constantinople was, as well as being the capital of the Byzantium Empire. Mussolini picked a time when Rome was starting to lose its stuff.


#17

Yep, Constantinople was the New Williamsburg.


#18

Quod hoc? Urbs pro formicas?

When talking about the city the people of Rome typically used urbs which means city but also usually the city of Rome specifically. The word Roma was often used for the nation rather than for the city. Verbs, like conjugations of to be, were often omitted. The same goes for pronouns because the omitted pronouns and relationship between subjects and objects could be worked out from the declension (of which there are five, singular and plural) of the nouns and adjectives. If you think this is confusing you are correct. Latin is a difficult language. And that’s before all the plentiful exceptions to the many, many rules.


#19

As in Greenpoint?


#20

Yeah I was wondering why they chose that era of the city, but my guess is that it ensured that all the ancient ruins that people were familiar with in the 20th century would also be in the model… Rome at the time of Augustus’s birth wouldn’t have had the Colosseum, Pantheon, or the forum as it would be known to contemporary Italians… If I remember correctly, even the geography of the city would have been different before the the great fire, ect.