More Americans than ever are giving up their US citizenship

I don’t have a decision to make. No Irish grandparents, sadly, so stuck with my soon to be blue (black) British passport.

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As I understand it (from talking with an expat friend living in Germany)the US tax isn’t necessarily bad. According to him as long as you make less than $100k/yr you basically just file a form that tells the IRS “I made less than $100k, come bother me next year” and that’s all.

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Yeah, sorry, I meant @RandomDude’s decision. Got mixed up with orange-ish brown avatar pictures there.

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Yeah, the treaties between the U.S. and other OECD countries are pretty straightforward. As long as you’re not making over six figures, in general (and oversimplifying things) the IRS leaves you alone as long as you fill out the form and pay income taxes in the country where you’re resident (where the rates tend to be slightly higher anyhow, but that’s the price of social democratic civilisation).

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Thank you for this.
It’s a solid heads-up for those of us chewing on… things… since at least July 2019.

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It’s not bad as in “you owe a lot of money to the IRS (in addition to what you owe the country in which you live)” – tax treaties essentially mean that you shouldn’t have to pay taxes twice.

It’s bad in that it becomes MUCH harder to file, so that you need an accountant. I have to pay over $1000 to get an accountant to file my taxes, which would not be at all necessary were it not for the US filing requirements. And I happen to live in a place where it is not especially difficult to find an account versed in US filing. That is not true in many places outside the US.

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Not until the current…situation is over.

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I’d be in New Zealand in a cocaine heartbeat if I could.

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It looks like I might fit this. I am paid a base salary more than 25$ hourly (ironically, one of the things that will make it difficult to find work where I already live because my position was properly paid, and was even due a raise next month)

I would fucking love to move to New Zealand.

Only problem is the borders are closed right now because they actually believe in science and followed it so they have no cases of COVID.

Plague States Of America indeed.

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On this note, it’s worth pointing out that it’s MUCH easier to immigrate to Australia (and many other countries) if you’re willing to live in a relatively rural area for the first X years (where I think X = 5 currently). Basically they have a list of jobs they want to admit people for in different areas, and the list is longer (and the bar lower) for areas that are more rural. Once you get permanent residency (~ 4 years) and the citizenship (~ 1 year after perm res), you can move wherever you want.

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We’ve lived in a combination of Australia, Japan, and Germany for the last decade, and our US taxes take about an hour to file using TaxAct. Basically we just declare our foreign income and then claim the foreign earned income exclusion and we don’t owe anything. I think it’s good up to about a quarter mil per person, which is a level of money we will never make. Then there’s a bit of extra paperwork because we don’t have US health insurance, but that’s just another form that takes maybe two minutes to fill out. Costs us like $30 per year.

This is not an ad for TaxAct, by the way; they suck but they already have all of our information so we use them out of laziness. Just saying that filing US taxes as an expat isn’t necessarily that hard for everybody, although there may be special circumstances for your situation.

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Yes, it’s going to be a wait. But he can start researching, finding potential employers, etc. which takes time anyhow.

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I lived in Japan for three years, 2005-2006, 2007-2009.

For those here who have never lived abroad you may not know but this is actually a thing.

The United States has tax agreements with certain nations that means you basically don’t have to pay tax on anything you earn in a foreign country up to a specific amount.

It makes taxes a little more difficult and I think I was audited three times while I lived abroad and family handled it for me so it definitely flags you for tax issues, but I don’t remember paying anything on what I earned in Japan.

At the time the agreement with Japan was 2 years I think.

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And the Band Played Waltzing Matilda not good enough?

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Oh interesting! I’ve never been audited at all.

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I was able to get my birth certificate online from NYC for some time. I was born in Brooklyn in the early 70’s. I can imagine it is more difficult for those born generations earlier.

I’ve also overstayed a valid working Visa in Japan trying to ascertain an employer for a specific number of hours to revalidify my visa, all the while wondering when the immigration enforcement agency was going to knock on my door and carry me away.

I lived off of rice and canned goods from friends, with no heat in the middle of winter in Sapporo wondering when I would be arrested and dragged away.

Fun times.

Actually, no.

So yeah I am willing to do a little more than a normal person to live somewhere. I’ve already lived in fear of authorities once and I already do here everyday even though I’m a legal citizen of the United States

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They wouldn’t give me mine - online or any other way - because it was still in my birth name. And it took six months to get my mothers death certificate.

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