Moscow: Twitter and Facebook fined 4 million rubles each for refusing to store data on Russian citizens in Russia

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2020/02/13/moscow-twitter-and-facebook-f.html

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4 million rubles? So like 5 bucks American then…

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Yeah, but it’s still, like, 1.5 million canadian dollars.

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So like $2.25 American…

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Or a few small fractions of a hodled bitcoin?

(Or should that be a hedl bitcoin?)

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Less fines and more like operating fees.

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This is probably a prelude to both platforms being banned. Putin’s regime has made no secret of its desire to create a Russian Internet walled off from the global one.

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It’s simple: store the data, but in encrypted form.

I think we should help him. Russia’s contribution to Internet culture is - not good.

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A balkanised Internet goes against the original ideals and base design of the system. The Internet still routes around censorship as if it was damage, albeit not as well as it used to, and there are plenty of Russians who are hungry for honest information that can help them promote liberal democracy in that tyrant-blighted country.

Also, Russia building its own digital walled garden of authoritarianism and lies isn’t going to stop Putin from polluting the free Internet as he does now. It’s true that Russia’s contribution to Internet culture is on balance detrimental, but digitally isolating the country from the rest of the world isn’t the answer.

The best policy for someone in the West is to avoid pretty much everything with an .ru domain, avoid Russian-based consumer Internet services like Vkontakte and (since some of my work is in IT) avoid Russian IT vendors, avoid garbage “news” outlets like RT and Sputnik, and call out Putin’s tr0lls and useful idiots wherever one sees them.

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Actually, they’ve been fined 4 million rubles or a handful of much cheaper bribes given to the right oligarchs.

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And yet many still think Kaspersky operates independently of the Kremlin

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Of course people in the USA would be happy if their information was stored in Russia?

It’s not the Russian people insisting that their social media data be stored on servers in Russia, it’s the Russian autocracy that’s doing so.

People in the USA tend not to care where their information is stored, although if they were asked I doubt that be they’d be thrilled about having it on servers easily accessible by an authoritarian kleptocratic regime known for being a black-hat hacker haven.

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It’s not the Russian people insisting that their social media data be stored on servers in Russia, it’s the Russian autocracy that’s doing so.
Gee, where I live my government is supposed to
protect my security.

People in the USA tend not to care where their information is stored, although if they were asked I doubt that be they’d be thrilled about having it on servers easily accessible by an authoritarian kleptocratic regime known for being a black-hat hacker haven.

It is already in the USA so I assume they don’t feel anything can be done.

I don’t know where you live, but the only thing that the Putin regime wants to protect with this kind of measure is its own power and ability to loot the country free of criticism by pesky liberals.

Even when you take into account the NSA’s domestic spying and the privacy-averse business model of the tech companies, your equivalency is still a false one. It will become less false if Putin’s orange puppet gets another term in the U.S., but the shirtless macho man you’re busy here trying to excuse hasn’t won that battle quite yet.

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Use Signal instead of Telegram.

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I think it’s about $62,000. A pittance for Twitter/facebook, though

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