Nepal's porn ban isn't working - traffic is back on the rise

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2018/10/05/nepals-porn-ban-isnt-worki.html

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1ymvbd

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If the Nepalese are using VPNs, how can the site still recognize the traffic as originating from Nepal…?

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Most likely returning browser cookies and language settings.

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So wait, if you try to search for porn in Nepalese, doesn’t it only return Nepalese porn sites, or is there foreign porn that someone has gone to the trouble of lovingly puting Nepalese tags on?

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Guessing they learned a little English, French, Japanese, Spanish or other trade language along with their VPN tutorial.

Sex workers have been bridging laguage barriers even longer than blazing new technology use.

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As I said when the Victorians British government announced similar endeavors…

Good%20Luck%20With%20That

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Make Nepal Horny Again

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Your web browser includes your system language setting (and sometimes country) in its requests. Here’s a list of language and country codes. A web site could then provide you with a proper translation (if available).

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Has this message ever been conveyed, in such a clear way, to our great leaders?

Next up - ban VPN like Russian and China have.

It’s a spin-off from Rule 34.

Dear Nepalese authorities:

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Yet another xHamster story? Are we still pretending they’re a legit news source, or have we moved to straight up shilling in support of their cultute-jamming effort to unseat PornHub?

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I, for one, welcome…

The funny thing is that the internet isn’t as porn-driven as commonly thought…

http://techland.time.com/2011/09/13/how-much-of-the-internet-is-porn-less-than-youd-expect/

Time magazine won’t One Box, so from 2011…

The Internet really isn’t as pornography-filled as you might think. In fact, according to one expert, only 42,337 of the one million most-trafficked websites online are offering sex-related content, which translates into somewhere around 4% of sites on the Internet.

That surprising figure—am I the only person who expected it to be much higher?—comes from neuroscientist Ogi Ogas who, along with his partner Sai Gaddam, collected porn statistics as research for his book A Billion Wicked Thoughts. He went on to say that 13% of all web searches between July 2009 and July 2010 were for “erotic content,” down from an estimated 40-50% ten years earlier. So has the Internet just become more family-friendly as it grows older?

Thousands of years of dudes-in-robes trying to monetize both sexuality and shame thereof may simply have created a hole in their damnation mythology that cannot be plugged, regardless of its absolute fraction of any economic sector.

For them I shall break out the magnifying glass to find a small enough violin to play them out.

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