New study: Pfizer and Moderna vaccines' immune response may last a lifetime

Well I have no opinion as I don’t know what the medical community says as to the effectiveness of combining them.

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You’re totally right! Thanks for pointing that out.

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Ahem:

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There’s a few studies going on right now of a J&J first and a Moderna or Pfizer second (or chaser, as I like to call it) at 30 days. From what I’ve seen, as a very amateur Internet Scientist, they’re seeing good results but nothing that anyone with real credentials is willing to sign off on yet.

It’s not a bad combo on paper - you’re priming your body for a now and future attack by using multiple different vectors. How our bodies actually respond to this is something left to people far more intelligent though.

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As an under-educated, opinionated self proclaimed cultural critic and pseudo intellectual, I could see this social engineering project as a year of training people to grasp the rate of population growth and rapid world travel and what kind of standardized behavior we need to instill in a global population to measure up to a global village. With the mix of flesh patting and shoulder bumping with folks from around the world, it seems like having a vaccine manufactured in Germany, with slight variables to the vaccine manufactured in the US would provoke the body’s immune system, simulating a foreign body? (hair brained ideas, from my mushy illogical, overheated mind).
Would that logic only hold “truthiness” to one of the chimpanzee cold AZ vaccine, if they were manufactured in facilities around the world and not so much an mRNA.
I guess I should just read more… but this forum is a proper think tank.

It’s just as important to get vaccine to people in Africa, Latin America, Asia etc as to people in USA. It doesn’t matter where a mutation appears, if it can bypass vaccinations it will spread all over the world.

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yeah, they’ll read it as “life-long side effects

In any case, I heard doctor say that the vaccine (for whatever reason) gives you better resistance to Covid than actually becoming infected and recovering from Covid, extraordinary but apparently true. And a reason to take the vaccine, even if you’ve already been infected.

Because we’re swimming in vaccines here in DC and because I am terrified of the delta variant, I (semi-illicitly) supplemented my J&J vaccine from April with a Pfizer jab yesterday. Will let you know if it kills me.

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I’d like to read the full article but NYT paywall…
The extract did seem to suggest what you say

people who survived Covid-19 and were later immunized may never need them (boosters) at all.

But

That was not the next sentence in the blog post. Thus, I assume the quotes in the blog post are not sequential despite being presented as a single quote. (If so, sloppy writing by Pesco.)

But does

mean vaccination even in those who never had Covid?

Not being able to read the article leaves me confused about what is actually being said here.

As was stated elsewhere to day (I forget where I saw it) imagine a world in which everyone is vaccinated. There will still be infections but most will be mild, but there WILL still be a few deaths. The vaccine is not a perfect and universal panacea but it is as close as we are likely to get.

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At what point will the vaccines go from being authorized for emergency use to being approved by the FDA? It seems we now have far more data available than any clinical trials could have provided.

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Having just read the FAQ page of the Norwegian health authority (because I finally got an appointment in a week!) it is something that is being done and not considered harmful.

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Time to lobby your government to end its vaccine nationalism then

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“My” government doesn’t listen to me–I’m a resident of DC and therefore don’t have any voting representation in the legislature.

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Yes. The gist of the article was that the scientists showed that the germinal centers that appear after infection to train the immune response also appear after vaccination, and in both cases remain active for a long time.

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The EUA ends when the HHS Secretary declares the emergency over. It’s unlikely that will happen before the manufacturers gain authorization through the standard process.

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At this point possibly never?

As you said, the data is clear. What incentive do the companies have to push for full approval? What incentive do FDA officials have to stick their necks out and make a change?

And on the chance that the FDA would require new “official” studies of any kind whatsoever, and not just retrospective analyses, I really don’t see anyone, anywhere signing off on studies that have anything like proper controls at this point. We know too well that it works to call not giving it to a group of patients anything other than unethical, I think.

Edit to add: maybe if we’re lucky we could end up in some bizarro world where the pandemic winds down fast enough in the US that we never get an EUA for young kids, and then it eventually gets full approval in that population later on when they make boosters for new variants? IDK, just a random thought.

Moderna and Pfizer have already submitted for full approval, and the process has been underway for weeks. It could come as early as July, or it could be a few more months.

Full approval permits the companies to advertise, so they have good incentives.

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Thanks! That’s actually much more sanity than I normally expect from the FDA. Good to hear!

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My question wasn’t about when the emergency ends, but how much longer until these vaccines are FDA approved (and thus no longer need the EUA).