NSFW: sex and ASMR

this might explain salad fingers

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My first girlfriend wore watermelon lip gloss during our first kiss at age 12.

More than 30 years later watermelon Jolly Ranchers seem to shiver on the brink of tearing a rift in space/time, foiled only by the lack of Steve Miller Band in the backgound.

Does that count?

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You’re more right than you may realize. Hollywood soundtracks include a LFE channel (The “point one” in “7.1 surround sound”) that’s designed to supplement the main channels with extra bass-- 6 more decibels of extra bass, to be precise. This is partially to counteract the “Fletcher–Munson curve”-- a human ear cannot actually hear a 20 Hz tone unless it is quite loud.

However, some small speakers that can’t reproduce bass frequencies add a bit of discoloration to the lower frequency sounds, while speakers that are technically capable of reproducing these sounds may actually sound clearer and less “bassy” than a speaker with a sub-three inch driver.

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Isn’t this the sort of thing that seems to be quite widely reported when listening to really good music, or is that something different?

Frisson?

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You had me at “You’re more right than you may realize.”

It’s not only murmuring. Here’s an example of a different kind of ASMR trigger, pencils.

See also: Northern White Rhino Mid-Coital ASMR

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This phenomena is something I experience, though to a lesser intensity than others. However, strong aural triggers are choral drones, consistent rain, gas lines, dryers, furnaces, streams, and recorded voices chained through a reverse reverb, with a long envelope.
For what it’s worth, all those things ‘do it’ for at least one primate ; )

I recommend not attempting ASMR with the strangely menacing Pencil Face:

So I’m not the only one who enters a state of rage when some woman on youtube is mumbling softly at me while playing with a mylar chip bag. Speak up woman and stop playing with that infernal bag! So far my only reaction from ASMR youtube videos is higher blood pressure.

However I do get that electric tingle up the spine kind of feeling when someone uses something on my head or neck. Like when the barber uses the trimmers on your neck line.

Me too. Maybe it’s a form of ASMR or a related reaction, but when the barber turns on the clippers an inch from the back of my neck, or touches the edge of a straight razor there, I feel a shock and involuntary flinch, not quite the same as being ticklish. For me it’s an unpleasant feeling.

I expect that if I am ever guillotined, that’s the sensation I will feel very briefly.

This reminds me of what we used to do in 5th grade:

Get someone to stand facing away from you.

Slowly poke them on different sides of their spine at the same time until you reach the bottom of their spine.

Run a forefinger up & down their spine.

Suddenly grab the back of their neck.

They should feel shivers.

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No, you’re not the only one. I only recently found out myself that it’s a disorder called Misophonia, which seems to be neurologically related to Tourette Syndrome.

Seeing this article is utterly terrifying to me. The thought that these kinds of sounds could possibly arouse someone makes my whole body shake with unease. I’ve had a lot of problems, especially recently, where I’ve shouted at or threatened people for making these kinds of noises around me. It’s a nightmarish struggle. And it only gets worse when my coffee wears off and I start to get tired - to the point where I’m rendered completely incapable of maintaining any kind of coherent thought, and spend the rest of my day struggling not to savagely beat the source of my pain to death.

And the worst part is, this isn’t a condition that’s recognized by the APA, and I can’t afford medical help.

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Hey–it works. Though unlike the reviewer, I find haircuts to be an isolating experience that plunges my soul into darkness.Myopia can do that.

Also, some of those videos clip which is particularly nasty on headphones.

That is really annoying , and honestly when i am trying to sleep in the night , i get really agitated if hear any of such noices (until i am asleep ofcourse)…

I’ve read that it’s more of a physiological reaction than an emotional one. I have a physiological reaction to sounds like that- always have. It’s a tickle in my lower back. A tickle that is downright unpleasant after a few minutes. I can’t even listen to some music with headphones if too many soft sounds are in the right earbud.

I think I have some of each. Bag-crinkling (e.g.) makes me want to hulk-smash, but buzzing hair clippers (e.g.) gives me a tingle on the back of my neck and is very relaxing.

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