On the origin of "you guys"

Originally published at: On the origin of "you guys" | Boing Boing

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I assume that quoted extract is from Wikipedia, as the other links within it go there - but I cannot find it there.

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Guy Fawkes Night since 5 November 1605, when his effigy is traditionally burned on a bonfire, commonly accompanied by fireworks.

…is now very out of date. It is almost the reverse, if not worse. 5 Nov is treated by the masses as fireworks night, with fewer bonfires and even fewer bonfires with effigies.

The old ‘penny for the guy’ method of garnering spare change from passing strangers on the street has also almost died out.

I have no idea why the Gunpowder Plot link goes to a Game of Thrones article somewhere else and not to Wikipedia’s entry on the Gunpowder Plot

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Now it makes sense why Rita Moreno and Morgan Freeman were shouting that while trying to arrest me…

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I’m not your guy, pal?

I’ve heard British people are often very amused by the American pronunciation of “Guy Fawkes”.

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Strictly speaking, for Anonymous, it’s an Epic Fail Guy mask.

Also, by the time of the Plot, Guy had changed his name to Guido.

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Where I always assumed these guys fellows stole this chorus from:

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Starting in the mid-twentieth century, it sometimes refers to women

I’ve seen that in early 20th century literature; it was established by the '20s, at least in certain contexts and usages. We’ve got at least a century of gender-neutral use.

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As a given name, its popularity has waned in recent decades

Perhaps in anglophone communities. It still is relatively popular in Francophone communities like in Quebec (where it is pronounced differently – rhyming with “key”). When I lived there, I knew several "Guy"s. I don’t know any in America and haven’t even heard of any lately except for the celebrity chef Guy Fieri.

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Looks like another Guy snuck by right here on the bbs!

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Starting in the mid-twentieth century, it sometimes refers to women, though such usage is problematic given its masculine history.

The link actually says this:

While lots of people feel that “guys” is gender-neutral, many others don’t, for good reason when considering its history.

This seems misleading to me, treating “lots of people say X, many others don’t” as if the “many others don’t” side is established fact.

A week of writing and thinking in E-Prime should be required training for blog writers.

E-Prime

Robert Anton Wilson and E-Prime

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And here I was hoping it would involve Sir Guy of Gisbourne.

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It is completely normal to use ‘guys’ to mean people/folks/everyone in the Midwest. It has no gender here.

“Hey guys, what do you want for dinner” to a roomful of teen girls is something I’ve said probably a thousand times. No one is confused.

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In California, “dude” is also now mostly gender-neutral, starting with millennials or thereabouts. It annoys me slightly, but, meh, you gotta pick your battles and I’m fine with “guys” so why not.

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