'P Is for Pterodactyl' alphabet book teaches kids some anomalies of the English language


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2018/11/26/p-is-for-pterodactyl-alpha.html


#2

Fish.

'nuff said.


#3

This is why no one wants to play Ghost with me!
“What do you mean it starts with ‘cn?!’”
“Well yeah. You have a problem with jellyfish?”


#4

This reminds me on Shel Silverstein’s wonderful Uncle Shelby’s ABZ Book: A Primer for Adults Only.


#5

teaches kids some anomalies of the English language

Roger That!


#6

Reminds me of the Cajun who named his dog Phideaux (Fido.)


#7

I like it. I like it alott.


#8

That’s a great one. I was going to mention it. But, there’s also Neil Gaiman’s Dangerous Alphabet, which was a household favorite a few years back.

It’s lyrical, brilliantly drawn, scary, and funny.


#9

I’m totally getting one of these. It hits even with the regular books. “Cee is for Cat!” (toddler gives puzzled look).


#10

Reminds me of a professor from college who would spell out his name which started with a “k, as in knife.”


#11

Or… Ghoti.

(That’s gh as in “enough”, o as in “women”, and ti as in “superstition”.)


#12

#13

Does the book address the proper pronunciation of GIF?

I’m on the hard-G side (as in “gift”), which is of course the One True Correct Pronunciation.


#14

I remember seeing a whole radio alphabet like this with “w” for wrong, “a” for aether, “f” for fjord, “t” for tmesis and so on. I had a friend who had two "p"s in his last name. When asked to spell it aloud, he always included “double p, ‘p’ as in pneumonia”.


#15

We just got a copy and will give it to our friends who have young children.


#16

See, also, “Crazy ABCs” by Barenaked Ladies. Great song from a great kids album.


#17

The spec actually explains that it’s pronounced as “jiffy”. The only critique I’ve ever seen off that is

  • that’s not how G works (see subject of thread),
  • it looks natural to say it with a hard G and unnatural to say it with a soft G (I disagree, as the spelling is what made me guess at the soft G the first time I saw it… now of the word had been “giff,”…) and
  • everybody naturally pronounces it with a hard G until lectured (weirdly, data suggests a 50/50 split)

The last time I argued about this in person, it was with my friend who declared everything uses a hard G. My friend’s name is Geoff…


#18

Thompson changes it up almost every time:

I hadn’t recalled Thomson doing it as well, but here he is:

But I’m confused about “f as in fjord.” Doesn’t it start with a regular “f” sound?


#19

You’re right. I wish I could find that list.

					- K

#20

Gackass.