Perfectly preserved cave lion may be coming back after 50,000-year extinction nap


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2017/11/13/perfectly-preserved-cave-lion.html


#2

“It’s still hungry. Hurry up with that baby mammoth clone already!”


#3

I’m a fan of Scott Sigler, love Ancestor… so this leaves me feeling uneasy :flushed:


#4

Weren’t cave lions … really huge? It seems like a bad idea to re-introduce an extra big predator when we’re already destroying species left and right.


#5

Russian scientists + Siberian Times = Bat Boy.


#6

OK, I’m no expert but this kind of raises my suspicions a bit. What does the superficial external structure of the specimen have to do with its suitability for cloning? Shouldn’t the real question be whether any DNA fragments survived relatively intact?


#7

Who knows what these guys are supposedly talking about: probably a prop from 30,000 B.C., but what we now know is that a lion is a lion is a lion, including what was once called the Giant Jaguar. Lion subspecies do seem to respond to colder climates by becoming bigger. The largest extant, I believe, is the Ethiopian lion, while the largest ever was actually the European lion.


#8

Pass the ketchup!


#9

Someone get Jeff Goldblum on the phone to give these guys a talking to.


#10

Fifi, where have you been hiding?


#11

If it’s frozen like that, you have billions of perfectly intact cells to harvest DNA from. They’ve gotten DNA from fossils.


#12

From what I understand they’re still a long way from getting anything close to an intact DNA strand from long extinct mammals. The problem has been described as trying to reconstruct a novel that’s been broken down into a random mix of individual words.


#13

To be fair, although the first news broke well over a decade ago, there has been recent statements with cloning Woolly Mammoths:


#14

#15

OK just one thing. Don’t patch it up with frog DNA. promise me, ok?


#16

If this is so close to being reality, why aren’t we trying to resurrect recent extinctions, or bolster species on the edge of extinction when husbandry isn’t helping?


#17

Eighteenth-century preservationists forgot to convince a dodo, a passenger pigeon and a Steller’s sea cow to climb up on top of a glacier and freeze to death in 1768.


#18

its “perfect” condition makes it a potential candidate for cloning.

They said that about me, and look at me now!


#19

I’m sure they’ll keep in a cage, with a state-of-the-art security perimeter and maybe on an island. They’ll spare no expense.


#20

Flat cat, why is that cat so flat? Poor pussy looks like maybe a mammoth stomped on him/her/it.