Pouring water down a 165 foot well sounds surprisingly odd


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2018/03/22/pouring-water-down-a-165-foot.html


#2

Dropping Ice Down a Ninety Metre Borehole || ViralHog - YouTube


#3

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#4

We each have our castles.

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#5

More impressive is setting off the equivalent of an M80 in a storm drain. Friend of mine did this when we were kids and it sounded like a bomb going off the Grand Canyon (because of the echo). Obviously i don’t recommend doing this.


#6

Why does that creep me out so much?


#7

BACK IN THE OUBLIETTE WITH YOU


#8

#9

Wow. Sounds like the Ice Mole People took a shot back in retaliation!


#10

The Deep Well (Tiefer Brunnen) inside the small half-timbered house in the middle of the courtyard is certainly as old as the castle itself, as it was the castle’s only source of water. Its shaft reaches the water level in a depth of 50 meters (164 feet) and the water usually is 3 m (10 ft) deep. Above the water level, a niche was cut out of the rock for cleaning purposes. The lower stone walls of the building date from 1563. The little annex built in the following year was used as bathroom and changing room. The Deep Well provided sufficient quantities of water for normal consumption, but during Imperial Diets and visits by the Emperor, water barrels had to be transported on wagons from the city.

Stupid guests! What’s German for “If it’s yellow, let it mellow”?


#11


#12

I’ve been there, saw that demo live. Well, not on that day. Maybe not in that year. But I do like Nuremberg and Franconia. Do visit if you get the chance.


#13

Where is that?


#14

In the mountains of West by gawd Virginia! My family used to live in Charleston, W, Va. and it was on the way to Snowshoe Mountain, a winter ski get away nearby. An East Coast ski mountain, you know, where one could basically go up and down in 20 minutes with no lift lines. The Mystery Hole was always closed during that time of year but always had one or two rusty trucks with no bumpers parked outside with coal smoke venting out of the top of the trailer. I can smell it now.

http://www.mysteryhole.com/

Google Map:

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Mystery+Hole/@38.1206984,-81.1473163,15.14z/data=!4m12!1m6!3m5!1s0x884eb842037ac543:0xfb079ed01b5dba50!2sMystery+Hole!8m2!3d38.1239985!4d-81.1410982!3m4!1s0x884eb842037ac543:0xfb079ed01b5dba50!8m2!3d38.1239985!4d-81.1410982?hl=en


#15

Awesome! thanks. One day, I’d love to travel across America and visit all these weird, roadside attractions and this goes on list. The closest ones to us is Rock City (which I’ve seen, but awhile ago) and the GA Guidestones (which I’ve not been out to).


#16

I suspect what’s going on in the ice at 90 meters video is that the hard landing delivers a single loud bang, which is equivalent (in Fourier expansion) to a combination of all frequencies. Then those sounds travel to you at slightly different speeds, which if we were talking about light we’d call “chromatic aberration”, the sort of phenomenon that splits white light coming out of a prism into a rainbow.

Can anyone confirm/deny this theory?


#17

I couldn’t find a reference specific to sound in a tube that is not heavy on math, but I’m pretty sure it is the same phenomenon described here:


#18

Apparently we Oregonians have our own Mystery Hole.


#19


#20

I recognize that place – that’s one of the key locations in Cronenberg’s Existenz.