Preserving tattoos after death


#1

[Read the post]


#2

Part of the fun for me is that even permanent ink is a temporary tattoo.


#3

Tan me hide when I’m dead, Fred
Tan me hide when I’m dead
So we tanned his hide when he died, Clyde
And that’s it hangin’ on the shed!!
Altogether now!


#4

I wonder how often he gets “It rubs the lotion on its skin”? That must get tiresome after a while.


#5

Tune in as hilarity ensues on “My Yakuza Closet”!


#6

Ed Gein should have just called himself an anthropologist…


#7

It seems to me that Gunter von Hagens’ plastination technique would be ideal for this job. No need to skin, preserve the whole body, tattoos and all. It clearly works, he has one plastinate holding his skin draped over his arm, and you can clearly see the tattoos on that


#8

“The Tattoo Murder Case”, by Akimitsu Takagi from 1948, is a fascinating crime novel set just after WWII in Japan. Cursed tattoos, skinning and stealing tats, a locked room mystery, sex, fetishes, violence, “snake women”, sushi tattoos and the Tokyo U collection - it’s chock full of fun. Preserved tattoos lack one thing, it points out: warm, human blood pumping through the vessels underneath.


#9

I’d be curious to know if any unpleasant surprises occur with certain inks. The plastination process involves a period spent in a low temperature acetone bath; and acetone does a pretty good job on quite a few pigments.


#10

Yeah, no. I’m going with “just take some archival quality photos and be done with it”.


#11

Interesting story … but why is the man in the photo wearing a flower-patterned leotard? Oh, never mind.


#12

It’s not a leotard, it’s a leather jacket he borrowed from an old buddy of his.


#13


#14

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