Proposal for a column of non-reclining airplane seats


#1

[Permalink]


#2

People do things we don’t like all the time, hell i’d love to revoke the licenses of people who like to drive without using their blinkers. But maybe we should make special lanes for them too.

My fear really, is giving airlines any ideas to charge people more money for new things. Want to be in a (non)reclining area? That’ll be an extra fee. Honestly flying is expensive as it is :[


Flashing Lights
#3

I read this and all I see is that I will now be charged an additional forty dollars to be seated on the other side of the plane, no matter which side of the plane I was on to begin with.


#4

I was expecting an architectural sketch or model of seats in a COLUMN. Couldn’t figure out how that would work in an aircraft.


#5

Doesn’t this kinda rely on exactly half the passengers on each plane wanting to recline and half not?


#6

Never underestimate anyone’s capacity to totally lose their shit over completely trivial things.


#7

Ian Ziering clearly approves of this post


#8

I guess taking away the reclining seats in the coach sections of all airplanes just isn’t an option.


#9

There’s an entire Galapagos of internet trolls – separately and special evolved – to get bent out of shape online about just how much of an airplane’s enclosed volume they’re entitled to. With a bit of luck, some light background music, and a David Attenborough voice over, I think we will have a chance to observe them here, later today.

Quietly now. Patience…


#10

If that idea comes to fruition, the tickets I’m purchasing will get cheaper by $60 each ($30 per “leg” of the journey). We are both long legged; there is just enough leg room if the passengers in front of us don’t recline, but of course they always do. So we bear the extra cost of legroom to keep the folks in front of us from dropping their seat backs on our knees. Also I have bursitis in both knees, it’s sweet relief during a long flight to be able to move about in my seat a little. Something about remaining in a static position for hours, I start to worry about forming blood clots in the back of my legs.


#11

only if we assume 100% give a crap in the first place.


#12

#13

I’m tall and wide and hate airplane seats in every way. Not having my knees bashed in or my laptop broken would improve the ergonomics slightly. Not literally rubbing shoulders with the stranger next to me would also be nice.


#14

Whoever implements such a seating arrangement that prevents the seat in front from crunching into my legs – my kneecaps would thank you!


#15

the TINIEST violin in the world playing for all you people tall enough for this to make a difference.


#16

Sucks being short, doesn’t it?


#17

This is definitely a “first world” problem.

But given that it would be not just feasible, but actually simple to implement, I don’t understand all the grief that’s being dispensed to people who think it would be a good idea.


#18

yes it does!


#19

As I’ve posted before, this works:

\\\\\\\\\\\\\

and this works:

||||||||||||||||||||||||

but this doesn’t work:

||\|||\||\|||\

Since more people need (for age or health reasons) to recline than need to sit straight up, obviously we should all recline whenever the person in front of us reclines.

The reason this became a problem is because the airlines kept squeezing in more seats until people became so uncomfortable that it started hurting ticket sales. The reason it remains a problem is that many people are inconsiderate jerks who refuse to recline.


#20

True that.

Why not actually use some sort of bunks? I, for one, would love to lay down for the flight. Napping while sitting SUCKS.

Also, a possible hack for the knee space problem (Ryanair, I am looking at YOU!) could be sewing some sort of padding into the knee part of the trousers. Some models already come with knee area reinforcement with two layers of fabric, inserting a piece of foam or other cushioning should then be easy. I should try it out.