Pug named Loca can't run, but can manage to sing a song about it on YouTube


#1

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#2

Not Guinness. Bushmills or Jameson, I think…


#3

LOCA – Loss Of Coordination Accident?
I think that Loca just learned the goofy Boxer wiggle-n-twist from her sisters:


#4

It appears to be a neurological issue of some kind. But she seems happy, has a bunch of dog friends and what appears to be a nice place to flop and flail around so it’s all good.


#5

That was great!

You said it, Loca.


#6

It’s odd because sub-running gait, general coordination, and so on look pretty normal(to a layman watching a youtube video; but still, that would fail to be true of quite a few issues that do affect running; but also throw a spanner in most fine and gross motor skills); and that sure doesn’t look like a dog with visible deformities or range of motion limited by internal pain in the joints.

Any canine theorists have ideas?


#7

He is just a nut, IMO.

Here is my favorite St. Patty’s Day joke:

How do you cross Ireland without passing a pub?
.
.
.
.

Easy, go into all of them!

//grandmother’s last name was Neil


#8

She’s Irish. Which may also explain the inability to run without wobbling and
falling, if her dog bowl is full of Guinness or whatever. Shut up, I’m
Irish too.

Oh god this makes me uncomfortable. This isn’t a million miles away from joking about an overweight black dog as eating too much fried chicken and watermelon. Not cool Americans…not cool.


#9

Seriously, going for such low-hanging stereotype-based fruit (durian I think. Something about it smelling like a fetid pile of shit) is both really lazy, and even more crass that I like to go for. So that’s saying something.


#10

A world with no jokes would be a tiresome place.


#11

Sure. But a world with no comedy standards becomes cruel and repetitive.


#12

I think intent makes a difference.


#13

Nah. People know they shouldn’t really be making these stereotype jokes - that’s why they pop on a convenient “I’m Irish so I can say these things” identity.

It just sucks for those of us who are Irish not Irish-American because it’s practically guaranteed to be one of the first things an American says to us regardless of how they meet us. We don’t get to take off our “I’m Irish” identity when it’s no longer convenient.


#14

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