Righstcorp's terrifying extortion script is breathtaking in its sleaze


#1

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#2

Well shit, The Police are probably going to be difficult to get ahold of much less to get them to fax a report.


#3

IANAL so I don’t understand how they can name person X as an offender without proof that person X has any involvement in the crime other than being the person who pays the phone bill. Am I missing something?


#4

Translates to: Rightscorp’s investors are idiots, and they’re getting what they deserve.


#5

Getty Images does the same exact thing but no one ever calls them on it.


#6

We all have the right to be an asshole, but some people treat it like an obligation


#7

Actually there was an article on them right here not long ago:


#8

One would think the police departments would be kinda pissed, talk to their prosecutors, and start arresting Rightscorp folks for something like false reporting? IA(obviously)NAL.


#9

I’ve experienced this sort of decietful behaviour from small town lawyers in the UK.

I few years ago I had a minor accident with another motorist on a country lane. We amicably swapped insurance details and then got on with our day. Weeks later I received a letter from his lawyer telling me to pay his uninsured premium immediatly and NOT to forward the letter under any circumstances to my lawyer or insurance company…which of course I did.

I think lawyers would get some respect if they didnt generally behave like bullying sleazebags.


#10

I keep hoping an ‘accidental’ drone strike will take these jerkoffs out. So far, no luck…


#11

I think that ship sailed a long time ago. It’s like police officers or building contractors in the US, no matter what they do now they’ll be stuck with the bad associations for a very, very long time.

Oddly, while individuals tend to forget abuses rather quickly and move on with their lives, that bad taste in people’s mouths seems to be remembered on a cultural level for quite a while.


#12

I think most police installations are overstaffed anyway, and I’d love to see a force dedicated to proving the public wrong.


#13

If you want it to be done right, do it yourself.

Applies to way more areas than drones and accidents.


#14

Damn, now you tell me… there goes the kids’ college funds…


#15

Kind of the “bad cop” version of a Nigerian Prince scam…


#16

So how accurate is the hard sell?

ie will they actually sue without settlement? Will they have a shot at taking you for a lot of money? Is a police report that difficult? Are the police likely to take your devices for 5 days?

Basically are they bluffing or are they ready and able to take you to the cleaners?


#17

Most likely not. Suits are much less profitable than outright extortion.

Possibly, if they take you to court, subpoena your machines, you don’t have strong encryption, and it turns out that you actually did have the files claimed on them. They’re very unlikely to take you to court anyway though. Just ignore them. If they call, act confused and say that [person’s name] has been dead for 10 years.

They’re bluffing. If they actually took any significant number of people to court, 1.) they’d lose most of the time, and 2.) If they win it would still cost them more than if they never went to court most of the time, since most people don’t have multi-million dollar corporate lawyer fee money to be taken from them. Blood from a stone as they say.

For Rightscorp the best case scenario is that nobody calls their bluff and they never go to court. Worst case scenario: Every last one of us calls their bluff, and they go pentuple bankrupt from the millions of frivolous cases they waste their money on.


#18

Though suites make for great extortion material.

Would they really lose though? Civil litigation is a lower burden of proof, and their costs might be fairly cheap since their cases would be extremely similar, if they get $10k per case that might be enough.

I figure they subpoena Google for your phone’s location history and they can show you were home every time a torrent started. That alone might be enough to win them a case unless you can show actual evidence of a hack. And if it was you downloading (as it probably was) do you really feel comfortable perjuring yourself on the stand?


#19

They still lose money every time they go to court. The typical damages aren’t even enough to cover attorney’s fees usually.

If they can’t prove it was on my machine, then they don’t have a case. Guess who pays for forensics? They do. Guess how much money it costs them to go to court? A lot more money than I have. They can go pound sand. If they make good on their bluff they’ll still lose money anyway. This isn’t a company in the business of lawsuits. It’s in the business of extortion, and it hasn’t been profitable for years.


#20

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