Sanders-backed politicians are winning battle after battle in southern local elections


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2017/10/04/our-revolution-2.html


#2

Winning local races, especially in the South is heartening. If the Supreme Court can do the right thing when it comes to Gerrymandering we might have a real chance of actually “draining the swamp.” Dems should not need 70% of the vote to even get equal representation in this country.


#3

download


#4

was this a primary in advance of election day race?


#5

“with a platform that promised free community college for Birmingham high-school grads”

So no immigrants/outsiders (People outside of your community) need apply eh? And disenfranchising the less gifted mentally by requiring some proof of education before you can claim a benefit.

Amusing to see on a small scale the same policies some groups claim to be rebelling against. “Can’t afford it for people who are not us and who didn’t contribute to our society” and “we want our own people to have an advantage” and “If we offer this to just anyone, people will move here just to take advantage of the free things”.

Same song, different melody. If such arguments are wrong or even morally repugnant on the national level, why are they right on a community level?


#6

Atlanta would be a big win, of course. It’s a large city, and is the hub for the SE.

That being said, we’re a lake of blue in a sea of read here in ATL. Same with Jackson and Birmingham. You still have the problem of urban-rural divide, especially along the axis of race. The problem is getting the white, rural middle class that dominate the rural areas of states like GA on board with a progressive agenda. If we could elect a progressive as governor, that would be something.


#7

Kasim Reed isn’t running for mayor in Atlanta, Cory; he’s the current/outgoing mayor. And the current favorite is Mary Norwood (28% in polls), hardly a radical, although there’s a good chance of a runoff between her and Keisha Lance Bottoms (15% in poll and Mayor’s pick). Fort is in 5th place in the polls and has little chance of winning.


#8

Wait, are these races that are usually won by Democrats anyway, and what has happened is not Dems taking spots occupied by Republicans but instead Bernie-bros taking spots occupied by mainline Democrats? If so, then we are seeing people with no real ties to their ostensible party taking over? Sounds like what the Tea Party did to the Republican party.


#9

What the Berniecrats are doing:


#10

I guess I’m unsure what you’re point is here? This is partially how political parties transform in the US - outsiders become part of the party and change priorities. Happens quite a bit in American history. Do you think that’s a bad thing, considering the strangle hold the 2 party system has on American politics?


#11

Randall Woodfin was the State Director of Hillary for America, this attempt to re-brand Democrats under Bernie is really thirsty…


#12

I’d liked Sanders in the primary, but since then his luster has worn off. He seems more happy to snipe from the outside than actually fix anything. And a lot of his supporters have that same attitude, only worse. I am no fan of the entrenched two-party system, but fragmentation of the side that is a lot less evil than the other side does not seem like a good way to get things done.

Happy to be proved wrong, though.


#13

How so? Can you give me a specific example of him “sniping” as opposed to doing precisely what other politicians do, which is debate and engage on topics? Aside from that, what is he supposed to do precisely, given that he’s a minority of a minority regarding his political views?

And what good does unity do when it’s employed to tamp down alternative ideas (especially on the left)?


#14

This is about Berniecrats winning against establishment candidates in both parties. Both candidates beat Democratic incumbents either in the primary or the general election.


#15

Challenge accepted. According to the polls, Bernie is the most popular politician in the country. There is no close second. Painting him as a fringe politician sniping from the sidelines is just wrong.


#16

Perhaps it’s because VT is also North Kentucky?


#17

I liked Sanders in 1996. Still do. I don’t attend to lusters. YMMV.

He seems more happy to snipe from the outside than actually fix anything. And a lot of his supporters have that same attitude, only worse.

So, they snipe. And what you did there is what? Mmmm. Them them them, I hear ya. Them them them.


#18

Alabama has 7 congressional districts. 6 of the districts elected a Republican. One elected a Democrat. That district is known as Birmingham.


Let’s look at Mississippi.

4 congressional districts. 1 Democrat, 3 Republicans.
Looks like Jackson provides that D+14

Democrats have always won in certain southern enclaves. It’s nice that those enclaves have opted for progressive candidates; instead of, well, shadier characters.

But in terms of taking back the South? No, it’s probably a case of the heavily democratic districts opting for the “less centrist” candidates.


#19

Yup.

OTOH, it isn’t about taking back the South. It’s about taking over the Democratic Party, so that they actually resist fascism instead of collaborating.

Berniecrat mayors are important, too. More so than Congress.


#20

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