Scanning artists de-loot stolen Egyptian treasure from a German museum


#1

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#2

Woooo, 3D scanning saves the day!


#3

What I would like is for the formerly-colonial nations to acknowledge that these ancient artifacts belong to the nations they were taken from, even going so far as to give them back, yes… but then for the museum-keepers of the world to recognise that it’s potentially dangerous to keep all your cultural artifacts at home and arrange for a certain proportion to be exhibited elsewhere, on a rotating basis.

But it requires that first step of the British, French, Germans, etc to acknowledge that first moral argument, and I can’t see much hope of that.


#4

Why do I see the ‘Johnny and the Hurricanes’ video in the ‘front page’ blog entry for this??
This has been happening to many posts - a different video (or at least the picture with the ‘play’ overlay) is part of the post when viewing in the ‘blog mode’ that we seldom-tweeting, desktop-using cavemen use…


#5

Yeah, egyptian museums are probably the best place for those pieces of world cultural heritage.

The government is now accusing “two restorers, four senior restoration experts, [the] former director of restoration, and the former director of the museum” of violating the professional and scientific standards for handling such a valuable artifact.

.

the German Archaeological Institute in Cairo, one of the German and Egyptian bodies that cooperated in the restoration process.


#6

Just scan all the stuff, duplicate the things so every piddly museum in every Little Podunk can have their printouts and everybody can see the things in VR - from researchers to students to just those curious, and be done with it.

If cultural heritage, then for everybody.

And do it for all the stuff in the museum warehouses too; the Net can house much more artifacts than any spatially limited physical-world facility.

Because fuck exclusivity. If cultural heritage, then for everybody.


#7

Quite a number of “cultural artifacts” incorporate scale in their designs.

For instance, this is 666 cm × 990 cm

This is 269.5 x 530.8 cm

Whatever you think of these two paintings, the experience of seeing the actual physical artifact is difficult to reproduce outside the Louvre and the Museum of Modern Art.


#8

Hm. On the Vimeo-video there’s a comment claiming this can not possibly have been scanned using a Kinect like that.

This is NOT a scan done covertly using a Kinect! Most likely it’s stolen data from a commercial scan. They should have the balls to admit it.

I know nothing about 3D scanning, but these questions come to mind:
What’s the best possible resolution when scanning with a Kinect? How does that compare to this dataset?
Is the bust on display in such a way that the top of the bust is easily scanned from chest-height?


#9

Now I want a heist movie that involves people covertly swapping out all the priceless artifacts with high-quality reproductions then spiriting the originals back to their countries of origin.


#10

As borders shift, nations dissolve, and ethnic populations migrate, how do you know whom to give everything back to? Does Turkey get Byzantine artifacts returned, after having acquired them via conquest in the first place and now occupying Byzantium’s physical location?


#11

That’s for the Turks and the Byzantines to work out.


#12

As a 3d scan technician that has used a Kinect to scan things, I can confirm that there is no way that data came from a Kinect scan. First off: scanning through glass? No fucking way. Secondly: data from the Kinect looks like melted wax at best. The data set they are showing has been cleaned, but all that detail in the head dress portion would not have shown up that sharply in the scan.


#13

There aren’t any Byzantines. Why would Turkey’s claim as conqueror be any morally stronger than anyone else’s claim as a colonizer or looter?


#14

I think it’s nobody’s business but the Turks.


#15

Well, it is someone’s cultural heritage. The current culture has it’s roots in the Islamic conquest of Egypt in 620 AD. Before that, it was part of the Christian Eastern Roman empire, who took it from the Greeks, who colonized then conquered Egypt around 300 BC. There are some genetic remnants of the dynastic Egyptians in Egypt today, but the main connection between the modern population and Nefertiti is that they are descended from the people that looted and captured Egypt from the previous people that looted and captured Egypt, from another group of people that also looted and captured Egypt.
Also, how long until we are reading about the sacking of the Egyptian Museum by Islamic extremists?


#16

Many here seem to be trying to use history and facts but don’t you know this is about outrage? How dare you try and challenge these brave fighters against #imperialism


#17

Next-gen VR with 16k displays should do a passable job.


#18

In this case, isn’t the proper word “liberated”?


#19

Maybe it will be neato but I’d eat my Borsalino if it even gave me close to the same feeling as IRL


#20

It won’t be the Real Thing.

However, it could be actually more interesting than the Real Thing, if it allowed zooming to high level of details, and shown multispectral data too (infrared, thermal, x-ray, neutrons…) that’d make the invisible available too.

The most interesting stuff on art is often what is not visible by naked eye.