Silent treatment, love-bombing, gaslighting and other traits of Narcissist Personality Disorder


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2016/11/29/silent-treatment-love-bombing.html


#2

Silent treatment, love-bombing, gaslighting and other traits of Narcissist Personality Disorder

Oh, childhood & my guardians parenting skills come flooding back to me. Time for a whiskey, or five.


#3

And moving away, say to Mexico or Canada, is not extreme behavior if you choose to make yourself unavailable to the NPD.


#4

I will be so upset if lovebombing isn’t added to the DSM, and fast.


#5

I hope Trump starts glitterbombing.


#6

Cults probably don’t feature prominently.


#7

They do not!


#8

All true in the case of the NPD person I was stuck with as a family member for a long time (and still have to deal with now and then). Once you see and understand how one of these toxic individuals operates it becomes easy to spot others from a mile off.

One other thing to note is that once the NPD person sees that you have his number he’ll progress to the abuse and “devalue and discard” phases with you very quickly. This has disturbing implications in the case of the next chief executive of the U.S. and the 50%+ of Americans who see him for what he is.

I can agree from personal experience that getting as far away as possible and cutting off all personal contact from someone with NPD is the only solution that really works. Sometimes family and work and other entanglements don’t make that easy, though – especially when you’re talking about the leader of the free world.


#9


#10

Tough love, baby!

Sometimes you have to break some eggs to make an omelette. What’s half a country or so to sacrifice when there are examples to be made and malcontents to be punished?


#11

The silent treatment sounds pretty nice compared to where we are now. Can we have that?


#12

It seems so obvious that he’s a narcissist, but I hadn’t considered it as a pathological condition before. That really does change things. Seems like an idea that should get repeated, and promoted, and repeated until it does actually enter the national conversation.


#13

[quote=“frauenfelder, post:1, topic:90323”]
We want to urge the press and public to understand what Narcissist Personality Disorder is.
engage in the sort of bananas armchair diagnosis that passes for insight in the media these days.[/quote]

All fixed.


#14

Did you read the article? And have you ever had to live with or work for someone with NPD? (If so, you’d recognize the suggested diagnosis as completely accurate.)

It’s helpful to know what we’re all having to deal with. Forewarned is forearmed.


#15

Diagnosis without examination by someone qualified to conduct one is often worth the paper its printed on. Applies to physical ailments, too.


#16

Given his well-documented behaviours over the past decades, I have no qualms about proceeding on the assumption that he has NPD, medical diagnosis or not. It’s not like this grifter* has earned the benefit of the doubt.

[* before you object to my throwing around that term, I know he hasn’t been found guilty of criminal fraud in a court of law either]


#17
  • It’s basically impossible to get an in-person professional diagnosis of NPD, because the person with the disorder doesn’t believe anything is wrong with them;

  • The article discusses the Goldwater Rule, and why it’s dangerous to follow it here;

  • Access to video and computer algorithms means off-site medical diagnosis is becoming more common, even for physical ailments;

  • As they point out in the article, a number of qualified psychiatrists and psychologists have publicly explained how they’ve used available information to diagnose him with this disorder.


#18

Amen to that. These people think they’re God’s gift to the universe. If by some miracle you could convince one to get a diagnosis there’s no effective course of treatment.

Also, he’s a public figure who doesn’t exactly shy away when people pay attention to his personality and character.


#19

Thank you – we agree!


#20

You have a point, but we’re not using a diagnosis to determine treatment and medication. We’re using it to decide how to deal with him as our president. We have to have some understanding, and if that includes identifying his narcissism then that’s what we should do.