Steampunk PC from Datamancer


#1

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#2

Good God, me wanty


#3

Needs more bananas.


#4

Oh, gods yes. Of course, I want it a fair bit less than my ability to justify spending that sort of money on a PC...


#5

Does having a giant, tacky eyesore become more or less embarrassing when you can assure others that you spent $14k on it? Does the price elevate it to 'conversation piece' status, or push it down to 'overpriced, giant, tacky eyesore?'


#6

Does having a giant, overworn opinion become more or less irritating when you complain about the price of art, despite the obvious amount of time, effort and skill that an artist has put into it?


#7

I don't much like the look of it, but I can absolutely appreciate the amazing level of detail and craftsmanship that has gone into this piece.

As I'm sure the price tag will become a focal point in this; which I don't think it should. At the end of the day, this is art.
It's like buying a painting worth thousands of dollars... except this one has a world of asinine YouTube comments all over it and people to blow up in video games!


#8

I don't care if it's art. Someone spent a lot of time, effort, and skill on that. It's beautiful, and I hope they can keep doing it.

I'd buy it if I won the lottery.


#9

But can it run Steampunk Crysis?


#10

This thing hits a LOT of'want' buttons in my brain but the 'decorative gears' behind the monitor turn me off. It contrasts with everything else and makes my want diminish.


#11

If you're looking at the parts I think, those aren't gears, they are reels, to imply that the LCD is a rear-projected celluloid film screen. I wonder if they spin and flicker a bulb when the machine is on. Of course, to get even more verisimilitude, he could add the smell of ozone, lubricating oil, and singed dust.

edit - yep, from the description:

On the sides of the LCD case are custom-made, tombstone-shaped
beveled-glass windows through which you can see a vintage film
projector with custom-made spinning brass film reels, which is
pointing into a sort of light projection box with metal accents.
Inside this light box is a small LED light source with a
custom-designed strobe light circuit which flickers and flashes,
giving the impression that the projector is displaying images directly
to the rear of the LCD screen. The projector can be controlled through
a small switch on the top of the LCD.


#12

Oooh so all that back there DOES stuff (or at least can. i hope thre's an option to turn it off so you can use it even if the parts appear to be wering thin.) Opinion changed.

Datamancer makes some good looking stupidly expensive hand made shit.


#13

"Stupidly expensive"? Handwork, especially one-off creative handwork, isn't cheap. By definition, it's worth what someone is willing to pay for it.

As a functional art piece, with a lot of nice attention to detail, that's capable of setting the tone of an entire room, I'd say the asking price isn't unreasonable. Pity it's on the Left Coast; I might be more likely to bid on it if I could see it in person and if supervised transportation was a bit easier to arrange.


#14

Hm. Tempting to write a display driver hack which occasionally flickers the LCD display, to help support that illusion.


#15

That is stunningly beautiful. I can't imagine how the people who made it could bear to sell it for any amount of money.


#16

Now look here...


#17

Just.... stop. You're reaching here. When I use 'stupidly expensive' I mean it cost a lot to make both in man-hours and materials. I'm not calling the Thing stupid. It's a work of art and ijust saw the things behind the monitor and kindof WTF'd over it feeling out of place (and then someone pointing out it has a purpose that helps complete the look.)

And as much as I'd want it, I'd more want to know how he made it even though I do not posess the tools to do this. Doesn't help tht I'm flat broke so ownership is next to unlikely outside of quantium tunnling.


#18

Who came up with the term "clacker"? I've never heard of a Morse Code key refereed to that way.


#19

Apologies; I don't use the phrase that way so I'm sure I was indeed overreacting a bit.

If you'd like to learn more about the basic techniques, the steampunk maker community has put a lot of information on line covering everything from keyboard and mouse mods to brass etching all the way up to homebrew metalcasting. One of the sites I was following closely (but got distracted from) was Jake von Slatt's http://steampunkworkshop.com/, not to be confused with the also tempting http://jakehildebrandt.com/ The thing I like about von Slatt's site is that he shows builds for realistically period devices such as a Wimhurst Influence Machine as well as the more fantastic.


#20

I've occasionally heard the old-style Morse sounders (which are just coils pulling a piece down so it thunks rather than producing a buzz) referred to this way. Those required a bit more skill to transcribe, since you had to distinguish time between two sounds (down and up) rather than duration of a single sound, but they were also bog-simple to build... and that seems to be the design this one is based upon.

Websearch does find a few examples of that usage... mostly shading over into the steampunk/fantasy realm.

Finding the first such reference could be an interesting challenge. Unless the dictionary publishers have already done so; I'd suggest checking the unabridged.