Supreme Court hasn't really 'gotten to' email, but that won't stop them from ruling on technology cases


#1

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#2

In other words, they remember how to communicate securely when necessary.


#3

Hey Chamber Aide, what took so long and did you see that eerie green light crossing the top of that room over there.


#4

Reflecting on this a bit, I believe this is a good thing. Email is wonderful, fast, quick, and damn near free -- easy to dash off an incomplete thought.

These people are writing down words in a manner in which their context shapes the interpretation of a country's entire body of law. Hell, it's OK that they take their time and focus on developing a coherent document: complete with revisions, edits, and footnotes a plenty.


#5

Maybe they know about the NSA.
"Hey I sit on the FISA court. I know what and how we can spy on people. Email sucks. "


#6

So, their commuications are free from NSA spying? For now at least.


#7

"DOMA unconstnl, deprvs =lbrty of prsns, 5h amndmt. Prncpl fcn 2 idntfy & make un= subset of st8-sanctned mriges. Roberts, Scalia dssnt, lol."


#8

I can understand this. It's more difficult to spoof. And the 'paper trail' is made and archived.

I seriously doubt they use the same media for day to day email etc.

They have to be thoughful..instead of reactionary and jot off a missive to spam other judges..and it's a matter of public record with a hard core origin stamp...that's hard to fake

I'm sure the SCOTUS uses email for personal communications with their family, grand kids, etc..etc.

And this particular 'OH MY these dude don't understand tech" is rather stupid.

In Fact: it might show they DO know tech..and don't trust official email to not be altered. and depend on hard copy with hand sigs delivered to others by hand:
Which is the exact opposite of the premise of the post.

Or understand that official commutations should be thoughtful and not (which we are guilty of) a quick late night post that's really farked up.

/Scan the letters and put them in the archives for public viewing.


#9

Printed on ivory paper? What, no quill pens?


#10

The purchase and transfer of Ivory paper is currently regulated by the NSA, don't think they are free.


#11

They aren't sailors either, but that won't stop them from ruling on the laws of the sea.

The Supreme Court justices weren't pulled out of a vaccum (except for Scalia--he was sent into the void after being rejected from hell). I don't think they are ignorant of technology. I think what they care about is the appearance and dignity of the court.


#12

Funny you should ask about that.


#13

If I thought they were, on average, doing a good job I'd totally be with you!

But. . .yeah. Not so much.


#14

Are these memos transported in sealed envelopes? Are they hand typed or handwritten?

If no, not so secure.

At this point, I'd bet that the NSA has a mole even there to gather intelligence. Just in case it turns out that a majority of the judges are secret Taliban sympathizers. As evidenced by non-NSA-friendly rulings.


#15

no e-mail, really? Old people should be banned, or at least regulated.


#16

There you go! I was wondering where the mockery was. Look at the primitive old people!


#17

How does the FOIA play into this?


#18

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