Taxpayers pick up the tab for violent, abusive, murdering cops 99.8% of the time


#1

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#2

we are the 99%


#3

You know what else? We also cheer for those cops and fundraise for their expenses and hurl abuse at anybody who objects to a little taste of the truncheon…


#4

Follow the money… :frowning:


#5

Speak for yourself. Don’t attempt to speak for me.


#6

We´re already paying our handler´s wages, why not their lawsuits?


#7

The people who are paying the penalties are the people who are given an incentive to change their behavior.

Think about that.

It’s the taxpayers who are being motivated to become more compliant, rather than the police officers to become less violent.


#8

If people that were abused took the cops pension then, and only then, would the police begin to change…
I mean, they get away with murder, so if fear of jail won’t stop them then maybe we need to look at the bottom line for them.

Sue the cop, not the police force.


#9

If you think about it, these results aren’t at all surprising. If any other employee makes a mistake on the job, the employer is likely to pay the judgment. Sometimes that’s a result of state tort claim statutes. Sometimes its a product of agency law, but the result is the same. Why should police be subject to a different set of rules.

We’re having an impossible time recruiting police in this country right now, no matter what we pay, and no matter what the benefits and pensions. Create a special rule for them that they and their employers have to pay damages resulting from on-the-job mistakes, and the recruiting problem might get a wee bit worse.


#10

Do you have a source for that?

Because they get a free pass to detain, arrest, restrain, beat, maim, or kill us.


#11

[quote=“wiaitchison, post:9, topic:47859”]
Why should police be subject to a different set of rules.
[/quote].

Police officers are held to a higher standard of behavior by society, because they are stewards of the public trust and are empowered to apply force and remove constitutional privileges when lawfully justified. They take an oath of office, are expected to comply with professional codes of ethics, and are subject to various laws, rules, and regulations.

From Police Chief Magazine - The Professional Voice of Law Enforcement


#12

I think that if we’re footing the bill for the police beating and choking people, we should at least have some say in who they assault.

I have a little list of suggested targets right here …


#13

Thats ok. Theyll just do a little extra civil forfeiture to make up the difference. No big deal.


#14

The perfect crime.


#15

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