Texas Republican says vaccines are "sorcery"

Two things:

  1. Interesting that all anti-vaxxers are of the age where they would have been compulsory vaccinated
  2. Jonathan Stickland probably doesn’t worry about his childrens’ safety because he has incel written all over his face.
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This trend seems to come up in a lot of areas where a trend or technique changes things for the better. Eventually the people who remember the status quo ante die off, and you get the hard-of-thinking going “so why do we bother with X anyway, it’d be cheaper not to and it wouldn’t be so bad”…

Same with the generations who went through two world wars dying off.

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Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic. Arthur C. Clarke, 1973

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The anti knowledge morons, dunderheads, imbeciles, doltish, and the brain dead have banded together as a voting block within the republican party and all this guy is doing is representing them. Everyone deserves a vote. Even the worst people.

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OMG, what a fucking asshole. OTOH,

The sorcery works, so screw off you jerk.

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We can only hope. :smirk:

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It’s especially curious coming from an evangelical Xtianist. Or maybe not, considering he’d go to one of those grifter preachers to pray away the symptoms of appendicitis for a hefty “tithe” before seeing one of these “sorcerers”.

According to his bio he has two young (and presumably un-vaccinated, unless he’s yet another GOP hypocrite) daughters.

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Probably, but this will suffice…

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Most likely situation.

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It’s always the best response to anti-science comments.

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Today I learned AOL was still around. Wow.

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Hey, man, I’m old, stuck in my ways, whatever. Have mercy.

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They’re holding steady at about 2-million people using the dial-up service since at least 2014. At $20/month that’s a big chunk of their revenue.

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Maybe Rep Strickland would be more plausible if he wore the make up too?

magnets

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This is in part a consequence of denying that the public good (a) exists, and (b) deserves to be invested in. (Also: for those from the Cato institute just tuning in public good ≠ individual good. :wink: )

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As a public health professional who trains public health professionals, please let me say on the record:

Mandatory vaccinations deserve precisely the same religious and philosophical exemptions as those granted for drunk driving, age of alcohol purchase, fire department jurisdiction, assault & battery, and income taxes.

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Preach sister. Problem is there is mounting research showing that the thought process of most vaccine avoiders is essentially the “special snowflake” argument. In essence, “Yes, vaccines are very important and you should get your kids vaccinated. So I don’t have to vaccinate mine.”

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Especially coming from the lips of a Republican representative. Same team, bro.

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Next on his docket: Why aren’t our local soup kitchens more profitable?

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Saudi Arabia’s War on Witchcraft: A special unit of the religious police pursues magical crime aggressively, and the convicted face death sentences.

A man was sentenced to death in Malawi on Friday for killing an albino teenager in a case which has become a campaign issue ahead of a national election this month, with the opposition accusing the government of inaction.

Belief in witchcraft is widespread in rural Malawi, one of the world’s poorest countries, fuelling ritual killings particularly targeting people with albinism because of the belief that their body parts can increase wealth.

Witchcraft tales in thirst for land put elders lives at risk

Zambian army called on to quell ‘witchcraft unrest’

Tanzania arrests 65 ‘witchdoctors’ over killings

‘I Am Not A Witch’ is a remarkable, strange and politically potent first film

… and so on. You get the idea, and I can’t stand any more.

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