The coolest vending machine in California


#1

[Read the post]


#2

I knew it was Disneyland. I constantly get frustrated by not being able to buy the things that are just on display in “stores” at DL that don’t sell the thing they are pretend setup to do.


#3

How hard could it be to custom-make some candy and some boxes? Might cost Disney a thousand? I doubt those trademarks are still active.


#4

Even if they were, surely it wouldn’t take long at all to bash together some similar-looking homages using Disney properties. The Tombstones are just begging for a Haunted Mansion theme…

The only trick would be keeping it subtle enough to still be tasteful.


#5

Disney.

Tasteful.

Good idea bro.


#6

Hey, they can manage it occasionally. :smiley:

I actually almost thought they were themed when I first looked. If those were real candy brands, then aside from the “Dream Spirals” and jellybeans they’re rather well-suited to Disney properties.


#7

I’m sitting here, strongly hoping for an art deco revival movement.


#8

No “just look at it” for the banana bites?

Oh, it’s not Cory’s post. Nevermind.


#9

when y’all go to the Motown Museum, don’t miss the candy machine in the 2nd building’s reception area. everything in that building is preserved period-correct: Gordy’s upstairs apartment, the studio, and yes, the candy machine is the same one from the 60s with the 60s candy still in it! It’s not just re-made dummy packaging, because the Chuckles package is clear cellophane with the Chuckles still sealed up in it, and it’s all yellowed with age.

The temptation to drop a dime in and buy those Chuckles was pretty powerful. But I didn’t actually want them, I just wanted to see if it would work, and stealing from the museum would be kinda foul.

[Oh, and if you can sing, be sure to raise your hand at the end when the guide asks for volunteers. You get to stand under the mics and sing either “My Girl” or “Stop In The Name Of Love” right where it was actually recorded. I threw a little Temptation Walk in there, too.]


#10

I totally know what you mean. How hard would it be for them to produce some retro merchandise to give some depth to their facade. At DL and DW everything is only skin deep, that brick wall…plastic.

@noahdjango There is a frontier fort in BC that has all the old shops running including an old time candy shop, and you can get all sorts of candies that I didn’t think existed anymore for a few cents. very cool. there i actually feel like a time travler, my daughter had a class trip there where we all had to dress period and live and work in the town for a week. you appreciate your morning coffee a lot more when you have to chop the wood and pump the water to make it and the coffee costs five dollars for a little brown paper cone they fill in the shoppe…


#11

The O-Zell jelly beans are a killer touch, Walt’s father nearly ruined the family trying to get the O-Zell Jam and Preserves factory into a profitable state.


#12

Given that this is an authentic 30s vending machine, my guess is that it’s not durable enough to withstand the massive influx of guests, so it’s decorative.

And no, the brick is brick. The stone is stone.


#13

Looks like an old Stoner Univendor theater candy machine from the 40’s or 50’s:

They seem to run between $5,000 and $9,000 US fully restored. So another one for the lottery/surprise inheritance list.

Those faux vintage candy labels with hidden Disney meaning just sell it so hard. I love it.


#14

It wouldn’t be profitable to sell those candies for 5 and 10, though,


#15

If it’s for atmosphere, they might not need a profit. If it’s just one machine, or five, it might be cheap (compared to corporate profits.) And imagine the buzz if you could only get those candies at one machine in each park.


#16

In my experience, you’re right – Disney is much more about driving atmosphere and engagement over (literal) nickel-and-dime profit. This candy machine might have just been put there for atmosphere, but if it became well known enough, with people taking pictures and decoding the hidden references, etc, you can bet they’d put actual candy in there. It’s a tiny little shop, and the renovations are pretty new, so we’ll see.


#17

I’m pretty sure those are all fake candies, made up just for this vending machine. I don’t think the trademarks were ever active.


#18

there’s something like that within maybe an hour’s drive (?) of the Motown Museum, Greenfield Village and the Henry Ford Museum. The museum is cool old machines and tools, (trains, cars, carriages, planes; a million things) but the village grounds have actual historic buildings transported and re-planted there, or re-created, including a working, staffed blacksmith shop and I want to say there’s a period confectionery. Maybe it was Cranbrook (also Detroit area) that did that? It was maple candy. But yeah, that stuff is cool.


#19

In Charlottesville there’s a soda machine that vends random cans of soda. You have no say in what comes out, but then, it only costs a quarter per cold can.


#20

The place here in british columbia is just outside of Cranbrook BC. :slight_smile:

http://www.fortsteele.ca/