The Pioneer Woman's Bolognese Sauce


#1

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#4

No vegetarian version of the recipe? ; P


#5

Use red lentils instead of mince.


#6

Hope there are no italians checking right now, knowing that the official ragù alla bolognese sauce is registered on the Italian Academy of Cuisine to “guarantee the continuity and respect for the Bolognese gastronomic tradicion on Italy and the World…” :wink:

http://www.accademiaitalianacucina.it/it/content/ragĂą-alla-bolognese

(Seems yummy anyway, I’m not against the recipe)


#7

here you go: http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/02/vegan-pasta-with-rich-and-hearty-mushroom-bol.html


#8

My current go to recipe is actually one that a kid at my temple (Jewish) published in a little book he put together for his Bar Mitzvah project that was related to eating kosher. He was offering samples of his bolagnese recipe and I really liked the taste of it, so I bought his book.

There’s a couple of interesting little twists to his recipe - one is that he used one pound ground beef and one pound of ground lamb (I believe he was modifying a recipe that called for pork as the second meat). This turns out to be a really tasty combo.

The other mod that is new to me is that instead of sautieng garlic in with the oil, he crushes a single clove in just before serving.


#9

If you haven’t used TVP before, a pasta sauce is a great place to use it. You just have to play with the spices a bit until you get that meaty flavor.


#10

Anyone who puts Worcester sauce in their spergdi bergnerlerse should be treated like the criminal they clearly are.


#11

This is pretty much how I make it, except I don’t use carrots but do use peppers. I like the idea of adding that much garlic though so I’ll give that a go next time. Oh, and if you can prepare it then simmer it in a slow cooker it’s even better.


#12

no dry cured pork (pancetta or prosciutto) and no celery = fail sauce

way too much tomato, not enough milk, red wine instead of the correct white wine: this ain’t bolognese.

also, I don’t appreciate her repeated racist interjections of “velly velly intellesting”

in short, meh. racist fauxlognese is racist. I make my own, better than this.


#13

“Tomato sauce that has nothing to do with bolognese, and it isn’t even simmered for two or three hours, as it should.”

I’ll call it bolognese :smiley:


#14

What’s with the “velly, velly intellesting”? Not funny,


#15

My favorite internet bolognese sauce recipe: http://www.theawl.com/2010/08/how-to-cook-a-bolognese-sauce.


#16

I like offal in my bolognese for richness rather than adding cured meats.


#17

In the U.S. there is a new company called Beyond Meat which makes a serviceable ground “beef” (look in the freezer section). Several other more commonly-found brands make a version as well. These are a step up from TVP in terms of mimicking texture and meatiness.

The actual flavor to shoot for is umami, which is found in things like tomato paste, not just meat. A good trick for soups and stews, and thus probably this sauce as well (although the cooked tomato base makes it somewhat superfluous), is to add – at the very end of cooking – a couple of tablespoons each of Dijon mustard and red wine vinegar (equal amounts, and then you can tweak the balance to your personal taste).


#18

Here’s the real deal- Marcella Hazan’s Bolognese Meat Sauce from her book Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking:


#19

This wouldn’t be a recipe for ragu alla bolognese. Its a recipe for spaghetti bolognese / bolognese sauce, a fairly standard Americanised/British Italian dish that probably doesn’t have much to do with the former. This recipe certainly isn’t accurate or authentic in regards to actual ragu alla bolognese, but its certainly a fairly traditional take on the “meat sauce with carrots/veg” that’s commonly called bolognese in the anglophone countries where this dish (not the actual Italian one) actually comes from.


#20

Of Bolognese sauce? It’s definition is a “meat ragu.”

If you want vegetarian, make a marinera.


#21

I was being facetious fyi


#22

Oh.

In the immortal words of Emily Litella, “Never mind.”