The wonderful GIFs of Erques Torres


#1

[Permalink]


#2

I am reminded ever so slightly of hoogerbrugge.


#3

Only a matter of time… And tattoos that light up, or that you can turn off (make invisible), or receive data. Tattoos will be hi-res displays! But I’ll bet removal will still be expensive, painful, and risky.


#4

Subdermal LCDs - I must have first heard mention of the idea decades ago in some sci-fi story, but now the idea is refreshed as “new” for the digital age;



#5

That looks horrifically uncomfortable. I don’t care how much it flexes and stretches, it has corners and blood-tubes.

Also, how would they prevent clotting? Correct me if I’m wrong, but don’t long-term catheterizations of blood vessels nearly always fail within a few years? I’m pretty sure I’ve read that having any kind of intra-vascular device immensely increases risk of thrombosis/stroke.

Granted, it’s a cool concept. I’m just real squeamish about skin stuff. I think I’d be more comfortable chopping off my forearm and replacing it with a robot than I would implanting my biological forearm with anything really.


#6

There’s a Stephen Baxter book where some of the characters have full body video tattoos set up to display the scene behind them, effectively making the tattoo-ee invisible.

Cannae remember the name off the top of my head.


#7

Meh, I’d be happy with a fold in tattoo.


#8

What a waste - because these are perfect for animated tattoos, but lose so much when relegated to a web page. Get over it, @LDoBe, this implant is now your duty to Art!


#9

I think that particular “concept” that involves blood tubes is unrealistic and unnecessary. Low-power e-ink displays wouldn’t require too much power, and I’m sure a subdermal photovoltaic unit would work, or you could go with inductive charging for more reliable power.

Personally, I think the idea is cool enough that I’d go for it if they offered it. But I’d probably wait for the second generation.


#10

The book Moxyland by Lauren Beukes (terrific author!) includes functional nanobot-infused corporate advertising tattoos. The ads can be changed and glow. The people wearing them get them as part of a package deal when they get other upgrades sponsored by the corporations they work for. Since the book’s release (2008), I’ve occasionally read people referring back to the book when discussing active wear. Here’s an example.


#11

This topic was automatically closed after 5 days. New replies are no longer allowed.