These hand-made doilies are beautiful


#1

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#2

For the doily aficionados out there, be sure to check out eBay. It turns out there are armies of grannies cranking out beautiful hand-made specimens and selling them on the cheap.


#3

I used to crank out crochet doilies as gifts for my elders back when I was in junior high and high school. Upon my grandmother’s passing, a trove of my own work was returned to me. I really don’t know what to do with them as my aesthetic is akin to Danish Modern, but it appears I could sell them on ebay. As vintage, no less, because these were all made at least 25 years ago.


#4

My own sweet granny used to make these, working on little toothpick sized needles and cranking out one or two a day. She had arthritis and did it to keep her finger joints working, and it seemed there was a trail of lace following everywhere she went. Lace and chocolate. I miss that kind old lady…


#5

As a fellow tatter, I’ve been wondering when someone would post about this, and I found myself nodding in agreement with his reasons why people don’t take up tatting. It’s difficult to learn, it goes very slowly (contrast this with the fad for making scarves with huge and fluffy yarn from a few years ago), and it’s relatively useless. But you can make beautiful tiny things, and if you aren’t averse to talking to people, everyone is always REALLY curious about what you’re up to when you tat in public. I find myself tatting more than crocheting or knitting lace these days, and I think the portability plays a huge part of it. If you know how to knit or crochet, you should try it. And let me know if you’re a lefty and need some help learning. I made it work just fine, but it’s more complicated than knitting or crocheting, in a way.


#6

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