Uber-driving lawyer explains to cop why he doesn't have to stop video recording him


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2017/03/11/you-goin-need-a-warrant-for-th.html


#2

Cop shitting on constitutional rights: reprimand.

Brown teenager with some weed in his pocket: annihilated life.


#3

I ain’t passed the bar, but I know a little bit,
Enough that you won’t illegally search my shit.

–Shawn Corey Carter.


#4

+1 bonus that the attorney’s last name is Bright.


#5

This is exactly why the police need to be retrained. What happened here is criminal. These cops should be fired.

With Trump in office we have a war to fight. It is time to assemble in large groups and unite the country. We need a super Saturday were renting out ever major sports area in the US.


#6

I don’t know, my take away was entirely different.

The office that was telling him to turn the video off, sure, he was wrong. Sounds like he got reprimanded. Appreciate the Chief’s follow up response.

I don’t see a big issue with the rest of the encounter. I think the Uber (that starts off the story with a sour taste in my mouth) driver was a bit on the antagonistic and defensive side. I felt he was especially antagonistic of the officer that showed up at around the 5:24 mark, who seemed to be a good job at interacting with our driver, Chippington Von Entitlement. And the whole shaking his head and playing to his camera through the whole thing.

Yes, it’s a micro example, for the first few minutes, or your right to film your encounter with the police, and one officer acting inappropriately. It’s not a macro example of systemic problems in policing and biased enforcement against minorities and the poor. Let’s not elevate Skip’s video to barrel-roll cop tackling teenage girls or a female university professor being thrown to the ground.

“Hey man, wanna see my bar card?” :rolling_eyes:

I’m white, a man, no relatives or friends in law enforcement. Feel like this needs a #NotAllEntitledWhiteKids or something. Sorry, junior and his blue sippy cup rubbed me the wrong way.


#7

A lawyer that has to drive for Uber rather than use the service is probably not a contented lawyer.


#8

The message here is that when this sort of blatantly-unconstitutional shit happens to even hyper-educated hyper-privileged white guys, imagine what happens to normal people.

When even the Baron gets (briefly) fucked, what do you think they’re doing to the peasants?


#9

Ah, but the fact that actually asserting your rights results in being viewed with suspicion is a systemic problem in policing. There is no “playing to the camera” or “being a jerk” or “acting Entitled” exception to certain rights. And the public’s attitude enables that. If more people did what he did, maybe we wouldn’t be stuck with bullshit checkpoints.

Acting “antagonistic and defensive” is exactly what I would expect during a police encounter in which a person has to defend their (and our) basic rights against someone who the driver knows 1)is wrong and 2)has vast power to dramatically affect his life if the officer chooses to anyway.


#10

A rare victory.


#11

I don’t see a big issue with the rest of the encounter. I think the Uber (that starts off the story with a sour taste in my mouth) driver was a bit on the antagonistic and defensive side. I felt he was especially antagonistic of the officer that showed up at around the 5:24 mark, who seemed to be a good job at interacting with our driver, Chippington Von Entitlement. And the whole shaking his head and playing to his camera through the whole thing.

You’re ignoring what it’s like to be pulled over by the cops. It’s a stressful situation. You don’t get to rewind your experience and start over like a Monday morning sportsballer who gets to comment after the fact from the comfort of his computer chair. The initial interaction can set the tone for the rest of the experience. And being lied to by an authority figure who has the ability to arrest and beat you often with impunity should put anyone on the defensive and knowing your rights when an authority figure is abusing their power is an odd thing to label “antagonism.”

Everyone who encounters cops that lie like this and abuse their authority like this (and violate SCOTUS decisions about not making you wait for a canine unit to show up) should be safe enough to act like this guy did. That they can’t means this is a great example of what’s wrong with the cops, not this guy.


#12

Small bad things can lead to big bad things. If we point out the small bad things, and make a big deal out of them, then we have a chance to not have big bad things.


#13

From what he was saying about working at the courthouse he may be a public defender, sure didn’t act like an ADA. Not a fun or well paying job anywhere, but in the south where they’re barely funded it’s the worst anywhere. With the OP it’s all part of systemic contempt for the law and particularly SCOTUS. They cut taxes and then claim there’s no money to comply with the law requiring legal representation for defendants.


#14

[quote=“Enkita, post:7, topic:96812, full:true”]

In another paper he states that he’s just starting his practice / scraping by and using Uber for extra money to help pay off college.


#15

The interesting thing about drivers who are pulled over is that they get to act any way they’d like after the officers start the process outright lying to them. If the officer wants to pull a macro aggression then I don’t see a series of micro aggressions afterwards as any big deal.

You want me to treat you professionally? Then be professional.


#16

Ironically, broken window policing is only useful for the public when applied to policing the cops.


#17

Establishing a sousveillance state (not to be confused with soupveillance) is one necessary component of turning the tide against our out of control/unaccountable police forces.


#18

I’m about to experiment with some soup valence for lunch.


#19

How likely would retraining work? We’re talking about people who (unless they’ve just arrived from another planet) know what cops can be like and how they’re considered by the general public, and yet still wanted to be cops. They seem to get off on their power and guns.


#20

I like the response. It’s unfortunate (to say the least) that it is so necessary to monitor the police, but at least this response is correct and appropriate. Accountability is vital.

Cockroaches scatter in the light.