Video captures cop trying to kill teen fleeing in car


#1

[Read the post]


#2

I’m amazed that the dashcam footage survived any “mysterious malfunctions” to actually reach public viewing.


#3

H-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-ly crap. That’s straight-up bloodlust unfiltered panic (at the very least, anyway).


#4

my mom’s piano teacher would smack her knuckles with a ruler when she wouldn’t listen.
can we just replace cops’ guns with rulers.
i feel like that’s an encounter you’d remember and survive.


#5

“don’t make me shoot” line (like “stop resisting”)

Yes, and the Cop’s graduation from the school of “shoot first, ask questions later” was a success.


#6

Randolph said, “It was a lot of shooting, at close range, so the officer is a bad shot, too.

Well, thank Dumblerdore for small favors.

What the insane fuck.


#7

I don’t mean to borrow one of your lines, but oh man am I saving this.


#8

All yours; it’s a useful one.

:slight_smile:


#9

Is the Hammer of Justice busy, because it would be put to good use on this officer.


#10

"He almost hit me, I was barely able to get out of the way."


#11

The use of positive reenforcement to train mammals to do tricks is not secret. Trainers of horse, canines, marine mammals use positive reenforcement with clickers and treats.

The police are looking to produce warriors that build up their aggression and release it until it is so egregious that they get time off (CLICK) but paid (treat); or suspended and reinstated (CLICK) with back pay (treat); or made officer of the year (CLICK) with a bonus (treat).

It is not hard to see how these officers are being manipulated into believing that their actions only affect Numbers and Statistics not people. Their bosses use those same tools against them.


#12

Perhaps the saddest thing is that the cop bought his own delusion even as he uttered it. It seemed like he’d been waiting for just such a scenario to unfold so he could act out his role. He finally finds his dream scenario, a scared kid who knows he is very likely to be killed no matter what he does. He did as I would have done at that age…run for your life. The desire to be a cop should be a marker in the DSM 5…there’s something wrong with this one


#13

I’m sick of seeing these videos. I’m tired of nothing ever changing. Cops, nationwide, have too much power and not enough accountability.

It’s a lucky thing this kid survived. So many do not.


#14

Meh. Too much judgment with not enough information. We have no idea how/why the confrontation was initiated, but we do know (from the accompanying article) that it was because the vehicle was reported stolen. It seems obvious TO US that the officer was not in any danger of being struck, but it’s also easy to see how, under the duress of the moment, he might not be completely aware of that himself, he just knows that the person he’s confronting (an alleged car thief with unknown motive) is ignoring him while attempting to flee and that it’s only one small flick of the risk to make even a slow moving vehicle contact and break a leg. It also appears obvious, to me at least, that by the tone of the officer’s voice he is thoroughly adrenaline-fueled at this point and a bit scared of what could happen; his tone has no sense of “power tripping” in it. But even knowing that it’s tough to say the shots were warranted, else he probably would have fired much earlier. I also wonder why the officer didn’t do a better job of blocking the car in place when he arrived, if speaking to the kid was that important.

Again, it’s a difficult call without knowing what started the confrontation, but given what is shown here it is difficult to accept that there is any immediate danger that would warrant shots fired.


#15

Edited to remove mental gymnastics between point a and point b.


#16

I was editing my original statement, due to getting more info, while you responded. My original statement is after viewing the video, my edit is after reading the newspaper article that is also referenced. In any case, I’m sorry that you consider actual contemplating details of a situation to be “mental gymnastics” and unimportant in making an informed decision.


#17

Oh no, I think facts are important. He very well could have felt “under duress”. He certainly had a lot of adrenaline going. That’s exactly an attribute I don’t want in someone who is supposed to deescalate situations.

If your first response to the adrenaline rush is to go into “warrior mode” and to cover your ass by making statements like “don’t make me shoot” then you shouldn’t be in law enforcement. Nice defense though bro.


#18

If I understand you correctly, your main message is ‘Let’s suspend judgement until we know all of the facts’.

[Edit: This is not a Socratic trap. I’m genuinely interested in your thoughts—I just want to make sure I understand them.]


#19

I haven’t looked at the statute controlling attempted deliberate homicide in No. Carolina, but the firearm is discharged deliberately seven times at the intended victim, and the perpetrator lies afterwards to the dispatcher showing he knew his actions weren’t legally justified.


#20

If you can think of something that could have been said, at that specific moment, that may have been more effective, I’d really like to hear it. Somehow I don’t think that “please stop so we can simply have a polite chat before I place you under arrest for a felony” would have cut it. The video is missing at least 30-60 seconds of info at the beginning that would be vitally important, and it should be obvious that “warrior mode” was not option #1.