Uber uses data-mining to identify and block riders who may be cops, investigators or regulators


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2017/03/04/sounds-legit.html


#2

That sounds more than a bit over the edge.


#3

If everybody did this, we could finally put police out of business. It’s a humane solution to getting rid of them.


#4

Like I need another reason to dump Uber.


#5

After reading all that I gotta quote Negan on this one (at 2:34 to 2:49)

Not saying that isn’t a bit shady, but it sounds like they thought through every step of the process and figured most ways around current investigative processes used by city law enforcement.


#6

Sometimes I wonder if Uber, like Buzzfeed, was created as some kind of academic commentary / art project. It’s like a living diagram to explain how unfettered libertarian shitheadcraft is indistinguishable from organized crime.


#7

Is there a dead pool yet on Uber, or at least Kalanick? This is the fourth scandal in 2017. I have to think he’s going to be replaced as CEO if for no other reason than the optics.


#8

I’m pretty sure I don’t want a Randian replacement for cops.

We want better, not worse.


#9

Another nail in their coffin.


#10

Having deleted the Uber app the other day, yesterday I found myself trying to figure out how to get across town and read stuff for a big ol’ meeting at the same time.

Uber would have been perfect.

So I walked in the wind and rain, and took the metro.

Uber - you represent everything I find abhorrent in the workplace. In mistreating women, you are supporting and enhancing a cultural phenomenon that would make it harder for my daughters to enjoy life.

I curse you, and will laugh as you collapse in ignominy.


#11

Do people still go to prison for obstruction or justice? Asking for a friends business.


#12

could be and would explain a lot…


#13

I’m a driver for Uber (which I am doing my best to get away from) and I am torn. While I want to cut ties with them completely, if I move to another city where they are located, it is a way to make money until I can get an IT job. I also drive for Lyft, but they are not as widespread as Uber.


#14

“Right to privacy and presumption of innocence? What’s that?”


#15

One of the top rules for fighting for workers rights should be “don’t blame the workers”. It sounds obvious, yet some people don’t seem to understand that changing jobs may not be easy.


#16

That’s defenses which are symptomatic of life in an adversarial state. Privacy and innocence are ideals which can still exist without creating an armed, privileged class of persons.


#17

I wonder if this can be adopted to resist environmental regulation?


#18

Only poor people.


#19

I wonder if at any point someone voiced the opinion that maybe spending this much money on non-core functions maybe indicated a problem with the model?


#20

Doesn’t the EULA that is part of the app get Uber off the hook for this behavior?

eg. “By using this app, you consent to app usage monitoring and profiling to ensure that we can provide the best possible customer experience.” (Note that they didn’t define YOU as the customer.)