Using a dutch oven really improved my sourdough loaves


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2018/11/08/using-a-dutch-oven-really-impr.html


#2

Jason, great post! The bread porn is also much appreciated.
Have you checked out The Sourdough Project? They are doing some really neat work on the science behind sourdough, and the stories sourdough tells.


#3

I have. I was very interested to find out about my home starter, but I heard about them too late to submit it!


#4

Same thing happened to me.
Here’s the spatial distribution of starters in their collection.


#5

I forget which recipe I followed when I started with the sourdough, but it recommended a dutch oven so I used it. Perfect result the first time. I was pretty full of myself, let me tell you.

A few months later I was pretty full of bread and needed to cut down on the carbs so I had to stop with all the baking.


#6

What this about farts improving loaves?

h5D9B3CDD


#7

Yes. I just hit my target weight and them immediately started baking. Today marks me putting it all away and getting back on track.


#8

I started using the dutch oven method a few years back after reading about it in the NYT - always great for any wet doughs but always always grand with a sour dough. Now I’m hungry.


#9

I use this method all the time. I use a very large stainless steel bowl to proof the dough and just tip it in the oven…no parchment needed.

I’ve also used a tagine for bread making and it works very well, tho it’s much larger.


#10

Thanks for this. You’re doing it same way I’ve been. I only just made a sourdough starter a few weeks back. Have made two loaves from it. First was fantastic. Second was horrid.

Also just followed you on IG. Glad I know your feed is there now. Thanks @jlw


#11

Thanks for the reminder about the Sourdough Project! I submitted my starter a couple years ago, but never heard anything about the results. So I looked up my sample on their website, and here it is:

YEAST TAXA
Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain 1) 90.57%
Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain 2) 9.37%
Saccharomyces bayanus (strain 1) 0.02%
Kazachstania servazzii (strain 3) 0.02%
Kazachstania humilis (strain 5) 0.02%

BACTERIA TAXA
Lactobacillus brevis strain1 74.41%
Lactobacillaceae sp.2 11.15%
Lactobacillus zeae strain1 9.02%
Lactobacillaceae sp.3 4.12%
Lactobacillus brevis strain3 0.39%
Lactobacillus brevis strain5 0.29%
Lactobacillaceae sp.1 0.29%
Lactobacillus sp.5 0.15%
Lactobacillus brevis strain6 0.05%
Lactobacillus sp.3 0.05%
Pediococcus sp.2 0.05%
Lactobacillaceae sp.4 0.05%


#12

Whenever baking non-loaf breads, either a dutch oven or a bread stone is a necessity, really. Such. A. Difference.


#13

Le Creuset makes stainless steel knob replacements, highly recommended for added functionality and also bling.


#14

Ha! I thought I mentioned that. I have one on my round oven. The oval I use less and am still not worried.


#15

Nothing like loving from the oven.

Papasan
circa 21st century


#16

Interesting. Mine serves as a candy dish.


#17

I too have had much success with using the dutch oven for bread making.

Though I learned it from a Cooks Illustrated recipe called “Almost No-Knead bread”. It has beer and a smidge of vinegar to add flavor without having to wait for the yeast to go for a longer time. The lid of the pot stays on for the moisture to crust it up then you take it off for the last 10 minutes to crisp it.

It is fantastically flavorful and rather simple:



Now I need to make one tonight…


#18

The best trick I learned with baking in my lodge dutch oven was laying the dough on the lid, and covering with the dish.


#19

Yummmmmmmmm.


#20

Just making sure someone did this. Thanks!