Watch a 60,000 psi water jet cut gadgets in half


#1

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#2
  1. Hey guys, I am shooting the youtube video for 1 minute. Can you please STFU. Thanks.

  2. Neat geode - almost sorta polishes each half. Cut apart some other types of rocks.

  3. Do it on some real guns - nothing historic please. Great way to see how internal operations work. They do make some cut out guns for gunsmithing classes.


#3

Interestingly I first heard something like this described, and, if I remember correctly, demonstrated on either Mr. Wizard’s World or What Will They Think Of Next?, another science program that ran on Nickelodeon back in its early days.

From what I recall they only worked on large pieces of metal so precision might have been a problem at the time. Looks like they’ve solved that.


#4

Wait, so the jet went around the batteries and the light bulb?


#5

I remember seeing it years ago too. They cut a book and a gold bar in half.

Yes they are much more precise now. A lot of machine shops use them. They must be easy to use because even Orange County Choppers has and uses one.


#6

Yes. That is exactly what happened. BUT you have to reverse the batteries and turn it on, so it creates a negative magnetic field causing the water to flow around them.


#7

You can even see the battery acid pour out as he cuts, so they’re in two halves, he just didn’t pull them apart.

You know, it’s like that anime trope where people don’t realize they’ve been cut in half for a few seconds.


#8

But I was waiting for him to pull the batteries apart. So much anticipation, for an anticlimax.


#9

I personally have a 45,000 psi water pump sitting in my shop that came from an industrial system at work. The motor froze up, so it was discarded. I hated to see the pump do to waste, so I salvaged it. It has some sort of ceramic for the piston heads and liners. I have not figured out what to do with it.


#10

Watch where you aim it. Those things are used for surgery.


#11

Before he retired, my father ran the engineering team at a major food production facility. They used water jets for all of their metal cutting. He told me once that they would get surfaces so smooth and level that even when the bolts were removed it was a job separating the pieces where 2 large surfaces met.


#12

And whats cool about this method: because its just water, if your finger or something gets in the way, you can’t get hurt.


#13

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