Watch a robot solve a Rubiks Cube in 0.637 seconds


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2016/11/11/watch-a-robot-solve-a-rubiks-c.html


#2


#3

Part of your life. Part of tomorrow.

::shudder::


#4

Sounds like a bad date.


#5

Nice, but didn’t take very many moves to solve, likely not really “scrambled” much at all.

It would be interesting to let it run from random number generated output for a few minutes to get it really scrambled, then see how long it took to solve.


#6

Apparently the most scrambled a cube can be is 20 moves.

http://www.cube20.org


#7

That is awesome! You just won the intarwebs for me! :slight_smile:

(Huh, seems they updated in 2014 to 26 )


#8

So we have religious differences then?


#9

I think the 26 is for rotations of 90deg. The 20 also counts rotations of 180deg as one move.


#10

Only if you’re a fundamentalist, 20 is Old Testament, 26 is New Testament. :smile:


#11

It’s 20 moves if you take all the Catholic and Jewish moves out. 26 if you leave them in.


#12

Do I really need a Rubik’s cube solving machine as part of my life?


#13

Just imagine how much more respect America could have right now if you’d elected this thing as your president


#14

Also the 'bot is able to turn both the top and bottom (or left and right) faces simultaneously, while holding the center still, combining two moves into one in a way that would be difficult for a human being to achieve.

In the early days of cube mathematics, two camps emerged on how to measure the difficulty of a position. West coast and Stanford mathematicians, free thinkers all, tended to prefer the half-turn metric,where any twist of any face, whether 90 degrees, 180 degrees, or 270 degrees counted as a single move. The east coast crowd, including MIT, tended to prefer the rigor of the quarter-turn metric, where a half-turn counted as two moves, since of course it could be accomplished by two consecutive quarter turns.

And now you know the real East-West war that lead to Tupac’s death


#15

I, for one, welcome our Rubik’s Cube solving Overlords.


#16


#17

Yes!


#18

Well, it would be a little limited in what it could do, but what it could do, it could do well!


#19

Milliseconds

Bah!

I once tried to get my children interested in the cube, so I learned to solve it.

In milliseconds.

About 300000 of them.


#20

That makes sense I mean, how many solved cubes are there? One, or six?

One seems the best answer to me, given the group rotational symmetry. So I vote for 20, not 26.

Democratic mathematics!