WATCH: Insane excavator cliff descent probably not OSHA-approved


#1

[Read the post]


#2

Weirdly, I find the stabilization almost as interesting as the actual act.

Also: Never, ever, in a million years. Ever.


#3

But once this was completed, he had access to the rubber trees on the other side of the mountain, and could fulfill his dream of bringing an opera house to Iquitos.


#4

Would have expected this sort of article from Digg.


#5

Is ‘stabilization’ why the video has weird irregular black sections and a transparent rectangle hovering over the main action?

The feat looks pretty ballsy… as in, “whoa scary I would never do that but I’m impressed that it was done (and ended well)”!


#6

The question then would seem to be: Who knows more about this sort of thing? The driver, or OSHA?


#7

Digg is nowhere as wonderful as BoingBoing. It’s full of things®!


#8

As someone who gives scornful looks to hikers/bikers who take shortcuts and erode trails, I’m dying a little bit on the inside.


#9

Did he ever get back up?


#10

Terrifying and awesome. But not surprising or the first such video I’ve seen. You combine a lot of expertise and familiarity with the desire to be expedient and show off a bit and this shit happens in the workplace all the time.

I used to be able to stand near the top of a 12’ extension ladder and just sort of walk it around the shop, which was full of glass, because climbing down over and over was a pain in the ass and no fun.

Now I just cook for thrills. Knives and fire are plenty dangerous.


#11

Dugg for the Digg reference!


#12

Best watched with the sound off unless you really like warning beeps. This is apparently how one climbs using an excavator.


#13

Yeah, it’s basically turning the original shaky video into a panorama, then playing the video at the right place at the right time. Very nifty. The black sections are bits there never was any video of.


#14

Alas, one of the rednecks who so helpfully guided the excavatory explorer saw that a final step was needed to appease Nature - wait for night and dash the vehicle on rocks further below…


#15

Ohhhhhhhhhhhh… 


#16

I think this also falls under the category of stupid excavator tricks.

But it proves that you can use an excavator arm to support the entire vehicle.,


#17

I’ve never seen video processed quite like this before, anyone know the software that was used? (I think it’s neat.)


#18

It looks like the output of a standard stabilizing filter of the type used in Adobe’s editor, Premiere Pro, or whatever it’s called now. Basically, they figure out a point that never moves but is always visible during the video. Like a spot on the root of a plant, or a pebble at the top of the hill that is left alone.

Then the algorithm locks onto that as a sort of zero-point that never moves on the canvas. Then as the camera shakes and moves, the video area moves around the screen in a sort of inverted copy of the way the camera got jiggled during filming. Thus a larger, stationary panorama of the scene is created, and you won’t get motion sick while watching it, even if you blow it up to IMAX scale.


#19

Yeah, some of the stuff I used to do on a forklift would peel back your eyelids… the amount of damage I could’ve caused if I’d sneezed at just the wrong moment boggles my mind… you get pretty confident if you’re able to push it.


#20

One of the related vids spun me out… really quite weird in a kinda cool way (watching in 720p probably helps sell the weirdness, otherwise the terrible anatomy on the driver sorta makes a bit more sense):

Judging from the comments, it’s a fair bit overcooked and the funky lattice boom would lack torsional strength, but it’s pretty damn nifty.