Watch what happens when you pour different kinds of molten metals into water


#1

[Read the post]


#2

He says he’s doing the video to put people at ease who comment on how he’s gonna kill himself, etc. I dunno, I’ve seen some of his videos, and it often doesn’t look like he’s taken the best safety precautions, so I kinda agree with those people.

Oh, and he claims that “aluminium” is a common mispronunciation of aluminum, which isn’t really true (though he may have been employing humour here).


#3

People are cowards. True, he could use more precautions at times, but there used to be times when chemists were more brave than today and he is a call to that era. He’s not exactly reckless, too. Even the worse things, e.g. chlorine, he does in small enough amounts.

Judging from him calling °C “communist temperature units”, and referring to Fahrenheits at 2:46 as “F stands for Freedom, go Team America”, I’d say that the humor hypothesis is quite strong.


#4

Well, since the person who first named it called it “aluminum” and not aluminium, I’d say he has a pretty good leg to stand on. It was just pompous British people who decided to insert an i where it didn’t belong.


#5

checks turns out Davy named it alumium, but he named it after alumina, which was not called aluwminija.


#6

Humphry Davy settled on the name aluminum in his book in 1812. He first called it alumium, but changed his mind when he finally saw the light of the vastly superior name of aluminum.


#7

No sodium? Boooring…


#8

The shining rain of burning thermite makes up for it.


#9

I would really like to see what a pound of liquid platinum looks like when poured into water, but before you do it, could you please share your address and the time you’ll be filming


#10

The story goes that Davy was so mashed out of his gourd on Nitrous Oxide that he couldn’t remember how he spelt it from document to document.


#11

This topic was automatically closed after 5 days. New replies are no longer allowed.