What it’s like to be a Russian journalist


#1

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#2

So, similar to the self-censorship that reporters the US practice…

“There’s no such thing as exclusive access to a politician or to a business. There’s no ‘behind the scenes,’” says Brauer. “For the media, everything is very manufactured and controlled. Everything I saw of the work that this state-owned wire service did was all through very official events.”
Only lapdogs get "exclusive access" -- it is completely manufactured and controlled.

#3

From a recent story in Politico

Whether the reason was Dozhd’s discussion of World War II history or its reporting on Sochi, the attempt to close it down is clearly politically motivated. On Feb. 10, Dozhd TV’s biggest provider dropped the channel, reportedly bringing its total loss in audience to 80 percent. It now faces a real danger of being forced out of business. Worse, the pressure on Dozhd TV sends a stark message to all others who would dare to challenge the Kremlin:
Don’t cross invisible lines


#4

Yes! It’s all too easy in the U.S. to swallow and believe the Big Lie that the corporate press that pumps out what most people consider “the news” is at all free or objective. Or for that matter, “liberal.”


#5

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