When the Floods Come: the Climate Change thread


#202

I’ve seen Prof. Kevin Anderson and colleagues talking about the social pressure to downplay findings so they’re not dismissed by the mainstream as quacks. Some of them felt like if they spoke the unvarnished truth they wouldn’t be heard at all.


#203

Candy-coated auto donuts!


#204

Meanwhile in Alaska:


#205

Rain in Alaska in January… :dizzy_face:

Everything’s fine, folks. Just keep on shopping!


#206

And more and more fun to come. Gotta love rising oceans. Maybe Mar a largo gets flooded first?

ETA: Nah, it’ll be Bangladesh.


#207

And then my house, fuck :worried:

There’s this app the government made that shows the water level if the dikes break. I live above a store, but ground level is around 3 meters below sea level here, so my house gets flooded too. Great.


#208

#209

#210

So in the oversimplified version, the Little Ice Age happened because an estimated 50 million to 55 million people were wiped out by plague, causing not only a sudden drop in creating carbon dioxide by breathing, but also by no longer turning CO2-scrubbers (trees) into fuel and the forests reclaiming settled territory.

At first, it seems a stretch. But mainly because we got used to the volcano theory.

And the more I think about it, the more I realise it is a possibility.


#211

Note that the genocide was only one of many contributing factors (and wasn’t only due to plague). The volcanoes etc played a role as well.

(and human respiration doesn’t actually generate CO2; we just expel what we inhale)


#212

Oh, I agree mostly. After all, I was oversimplifying. Just like it’s an oversimplification that humans don’t generate CO2 but mostly just exhale what we inhale*, since humans only produce roughly one kilogram of CO2 per person per day.


#213

You’re right, I didn’t think of the extra carb-burning bit.


#214

#215

A good place for this:

“…in recent years, scientists noticed something unusual: Magnetic north’s routine plod has shifted into high gear, sending it galloping across the Northern Hemisphere—and no one can entirely explain why.”

“In the mid 1900s, the north magnetic pole was lumbering along at less than a hundred feet each day, adding up to less than seven miles of difference each year. But in the '90s, this started to change. By the early aughts, magnetic north was chugging along at some 34 miles each year.”

Good thing that science says a complete flip of the poles would take a “few thousand years”.


#216

Wow.


#217

The “third pole”

The linked report is an open-access downloadable book.


#218

Not exactly anthropogenic climate change, but certainly another global change to be aware of.


#219

#220

Yet more reminders that “weather” is not climate, and our experience of it is all relative. Your grandpa is right when he calls us wimps for griping about these cold spells. “This ain’t cold! You shoulda seen it in '36. Now that was a cold spell!”


#221

While the article states that Orcas can be found in oceans around the globe, I’ve never heard of Orcas being in or near Virginia waters. Ever.