Why it's risky to be a bad-ass


#1

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#2

Thank you for justifying my lifestyle.


#3

if you want to be a real bad-ass, you need to rest as hard as you train. if you aware of this and have trained for other things in the past, you are probably more aware of your limits. but it doesn't seem like the same care is taken in some crossfit gyms, especially for novices, and overtraining with weights is nothing to mess with.


#4

You can also get this from medicine, e.g. statins.


#5

Years ago, I was hospitalized for rhabdo from a overzealous personal trainer (CPK 110,000). I now do CrossFit 5 times per week with no issues. It's not the exercise regimen that's the problem, it's the lack of understanding by coaches and trainers. My current coach would never have let me exercise as hard as that trainer did- all movements in the beginning were scaled down in weight, reps were reduced, long after I thought I could do the recommended workout. Each Crossfit gym is operated completely independently, so remember mileage will vary.


#6

Queue the typical internet user using this as justification to lead a sedentary, sloth-like lifestyle while continuing to avoid looking at themselves naked in the mirror.


#7

Isn't this the gym-geek version of the issue that turned Dr. House into a vicodin-popping asshole badass?

His muscle cells died of hypoxia; but the same overload-of-cell-guts issue occurred.

TV aside, it seems like poor design that humans can work their muscles that hard. A 'eh, the hell with you, HQ' response would seem much more sensible than working until you burst en-mass.


#8

Well, in times of extreme danger it can be very useful to be able to work your muscles that hard, even at the risk of serious damage. (Cracked had an interesting little bit about that a while back, if you like that kind of thing.)


#9

This isn't training like a badass. It's training like a fool.


#10

Actually, I find that being a transparent strawman is pretty flattering. (Plus, every roll in the hay is literally a roll in the hay...)


#11

I was just about to go there. Rhabdo is not rare at all! House suspected it least every other week.


#12

Yeah. It's not badass to compete with others. You should only push yourself to better your own PBs if you wanna be truly badass in the gym.


#13

Not just crossfit gyms, some personal trainers in general are seemingly unaware that you can break people with exercise. Good trainers do what you say, and make certain you're doing rest.


#14

Whew! Finally, one thing I'm safe from.


#15

Statin induced rhabdo is rare. You can also get it from crushing injuries as the proteins from the damaged muscles pour into the bloodstream.


#16

Should be called why its risky to train like a dumb-ass. Rhabdo may be rare, but getting injured while working out isn't rare at all. Crossfit gets a bad reputation from the 250 cases of exercise induced rhabdo its clients have gotten, but I don't think anyone is counting the number of preventable injuries due to bad form from working out in exhausted states...
and thats not a criticism of the workouts per se, but the attitude of some crossfit trainers and trainees.

It also found this happened to college athletes in groups, who were forced to train too hard by idiot coaches.

The two factors that seem to be involved are excessive amounts of exercise that tears down muscles combined with a lack of water.


#17

If it's not rhabdo, it's SLAP tears (which put me out of commission for nearly a year). I used to think that CrossFit was hella fun, but I can't recommend it until they get the Q/A on their trainers up to snuff (which is to say ANY Q/A on their trainers). High intensity training has its place as part of any regimen for overall healthiness, but I think CrossFit jumped the shark.


#18

Yes, let's get hundreds of thousands of yuppies to adopt an exercise regimen designed for elite military units. What could possibly go wrong?


#19

Or just an ass.


#20

I assume this is one of the reasons for the advice I was given in my last First Aid course, to not remove the weight from someone who is crushed after about 15 minutes.

If you get to them within a few minutes then you can try and remove the weight, but after then you should leave it until the experts get there. The shock from the toxic crap that builds up in a crush situation being suddenly released into the bloodstream can and does kill people.